Importance Of Organisational Behaviour

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Martin and Fellenz (2010) state that organisational behaviour is how organisations recognise and deal with the variability of human behaviour, and how this can, if utilised properly, be an advantage to an organisation. Aswathappa (2010) also mentions that each employee will have a different skill, whether it be a physical related skill or administrative skill. These skills need to be identified to gain maximum efficiency from employees which will have a knock on effect in productivity and the overall success of the organisation. Louis Peaucelle (2000) mentions that scientific organisation of works increases productivity with no extra cash injection needed for this process to happen successfully, this then lowers costs, which in turn leads …show more content…
This is why motivation and rewards can be one of the keys to a successful organisation. The use of rewards and motives in a work place can lead to higher productivity as workers have something to strive for. This can also have a knock on effect to the overall profits and brand reputation made as employees are more dedicated to the brand, as they want to earn the rewards and be recognised for their efforts. Mckenzie and Tullock (2012), with reference to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, suggest that employees need to be appreciated to gain self-fulfilment, which can be gained by reward and peer/ colleague recognition. As reported by Forbes (2012) research showed that 83% of the organisations they studied lacked in staff recognition. These companies were evidentially underperforming compared to their competitor companies. Incentivesmart (2015) also reported that Subway recently created a “Rewarding Champions “programme where all staff at successful stores, if they hit targets, received a scratch card with the chance to win different prizes. This had brilliant results with a 461% increase in the number of stores achieving the rewards criteria, also their mystery shop score increased by …show more content…
According to Suja (2010) motivation is linked to productivity and works with empowering employees. Suja (2010) also suggests that communication is the key to success, as employees need to share ideas and thoughts, so that organisations can make changes to their target markets current needs and wants. Some people would argue that Taylor’s theory took none of the above into consideration and he potentially demoralised staff, as they were constantly doing repetitive monotonous tasks. Anderton, Brown and McKenzie (2013) argue that in accordance to Taylor’s theory it was the manager’s responsibility to allocate employees the best-suited task. They also argue that the close supervision employees had from the managers, kept them on track, helping the maximum productivity to be

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