Immanence And Diaspora Analysis

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In this analysis, we will be looking at two main words, immanence and diaspora. Both words, which comes from Barber’s book refer to more than just its flat definition we often find in dictionaries, which is why we will be looking more into the theological and philosophical meaning behind them. Here we will be relating both the word to namelessness and signification, followed by connecting each of the words to the theological discourses that were described in barber’s book, which come from other authors.

Yet before we dive into this, we need to ensure that we understand both Immanence and diaspora otherwise this analysis will make no sense. Defined by Gonzalez, Immanence is one of the traditional attributes of “god often contrasted, and kept in polar tension with transcendence.
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First is that god lends it unique capacity to express immanence in the most powerful way” (). Immanence is like God’s ability to mean so much when so little is actually known. Yet nature on the other hand is a different story. Nature is a name and Barber sees it as a being minimalizing or at the least having a deflating tendency. This taken to a more simpler level, is that Barber is saying that we often say, that’s nature for you, but nature can be explained, defined and observed; whereas god cannot and that inability to be observed keeps it nameless and helps strengthen the signification of the unknown meaning behind the word. Trying to do a quick recap of everything just said in case it was not clear enough, Immanence is related to significance because of its namelessness. We observed that idea and shown an example by connecting nature and god to the topic. This supports the claim that immanence need to be nameless like god, that not knowing what immanence actually is, is what gives significance to immanence, that knowing the word has much more of a meaning to it allows us to give it

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