History Of Hunger

Good Essays
Historical View on Hunger
Hunger has established itself throughout many centuries and many nations. Countries in all stages of development experience hunger in various degrees. According to the Director of Economic Studies at St. Arthur University, countries can be classified into three stages of development: developed, developing, and undeveloped. Underdeveloped and developing countries have a low standard of living and GDP per capita value, while developing countries have more advanced and organized government programs and higher standards of living. (Downes). The history of natural disasters and the amount of industrial and technological progress associated with the development of a country has a direct impact on the hunger rates. According
…show more content…
Countries with a more organized government have a greater ability to advance in technological, social, and economic areas. Kim Youn-Suk, a professor of economics at Kean University, states that “Developing countries have little or no chance of keeping up with the increasing competitiveness of technologically sophisticated countries (Youn-Suk).” According to Bekure Woldesemait, a researcher of African Developmental Studies, Ethiopia is considered to be less than semi-industrialized with technological advancement among the lowest on the globe. The agriculture is also extremely underdeveloped. Farms are 2.5 acres large on average, providing little food for citizens and none to sell overseas to heighten the country’s economy. Having little surplus of food for trade, Ethiopia’s agriculturally based development fails to compare to the industry based development of developing countries. Woldesmait states that “Trade for non-oil primary products are low compared to manufactured goods.” Ethiopia’s government simply cannot compete with the rapidly growing industry of modern day. Frequent famines also make it difficult to keep a stable source of food. Recent famines include the famine of 2002-2003 which affected nearly 20% of the country, increasing hunger rates drastically (Woldesemait). Weak government interaction and an underdeveloped agriculture makes it nearly impossible to improve development and hunger rates. South Korea is one of few countries that has managed to transform from a agriculturally based, developing country into an industry based, developed country. Until 1961, Korea had an aid injection economy; they relied heavily on foreign aid. Much like Ethiopia, Koreans were exporting little and importing much in order to survive. Through a strong government, which was determined to turn around the weakened economy, they were able to become technologically advanced.

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    It can be reasonably assumed that the technology of farming in this remote area is limited. Most work is done by hand and as such this limits the farmers ability to grow cash crops. Population growth is also an issue, providing enough food for a household and extra to sell for income is becoming more and more difficult as population increases. Sustainability of this is decreasing, in the article The Analysis of Deforestation and Economically Sustainable Farming Systems Under Pressure of Population Growth and Income Constraints at the Village level in Tanzania it states that, Therefore, it can be concluded that the present farming systems are not economically sustainable for more than about 30 years. These results suggest that in order to enhance…

    • 1184 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Most of the population in Ethiopia earn an income that is considered low by farming fields, livestock, or coffee. Because there is limited prosperity within careers the majority of the population lives uncomfortably and in living standards that are inhuman, with all the income going to the necessities. That forces less investing and less capital, which is a main reason to why the economy in Ethiopia is not thriving. In addition, their existing technology is old and unproductive. Therefore, farmers have more children to improve their farming because there is no new machinery available to assist with the jobs.…

    • 907 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Agricultural Revolution, that followed the industrial one, further reduced the need for population growth in the countryside. The result in France was that it did not have the industry to support a growing surplus population, and the countryside in fact needed less, not more labor. These two factors of course meant that economic growth was much slower in France than in either the UK or Germany. This meant that even families that wanted large families could hardly afford them in most cases. By the middle of the nineteenth century, France found itself in an economic situation that, quite simply, pushed families not to have children.…

    • 1716 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    One person in four there are undernourished” (wfp.org/hunger/stats). Twenty five percent of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa are undernourished. A country in Africa known as Mozambique has the capacity to export rice or corn to all southern Africa. Instead, it 's dependent on “expensive imports simply because the political elites are not interested in the issue” (Schaeffer). The politicians of Mozambique are more interested in making money than feeding their own starving citizens.…

    • 2108 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    What Causes World Hunger

    • 739 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Poverty leads to people being unable to afford for food and hence people go hungry because hunger is more than just the result of food production and meeting demands (Anup Shah, 2010). At 2012 statistics, the World Bank has estimated that there were 896 million poor people in developing countries who live on $1.90 a day or less, compared with 1.95 billion in 1990, and 1.99 billion in 1981(“World Hunger And Poverty Facts And Statistics”,2016). As a family sinks into poverty, they are forced to stretch their meager income because as more money is spent on food, less money is available to spend on health care, savings, and education (Stoltz, 2011). Thus, poverty not only effect on their economic problem and also effect to their…

    • 739 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Khrushchev Era

    • 1536 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Many initial reforms ground to a halt and eventually, Brezhnev too focused on agriculture, and as stated spent upwards of 25% of the budget on this focus. Production did not increase, and “one reason for this relative failure was that Soviet agriculture had been so depressed that even rapid growth could not raise the level of production very much.” (Malia, 357) After this, food supply declined and agriculture became a burden on society. Growth rates of both national product and worker productivity were trending down, eventually proved lower than both Soviet and CIA estimates, eventually heading into negative growth. The Soviet economy had been industrially behind so consistently that missing the “great turn from extensive to intensive development” in the 1960’s and 70’s proved to be an incredible mistake. (Malia, 363) The technology gap between the USSR and the West was also increasing more year after year, making it perpetually harder for the Soviet Union to keep up with the Western World.…

    • 1536 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    With the lack of skilled jobs, being able to grow and sell or trade crops would be the most common form of employment. The economy of Central America is not stable enough to support an influx of new jobs that require skills and education. In the past decade, there has been no production of jobs that are considered highly skilled. Highly skilled jobs are considered to be jobs that require specialization in an area or field. The numbers of high skilled jobs within Central America, is considerably lower than that…

    • 915 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Making pressures of maintaining land and water extremely difficult. Whether horrible climate conditions or over population, food production has become very low in Africa while other countries continue to advance. They saw major deterioration toward the end of the 20th century when there valued decreased in the world market because items were being manufactured at high rates. Climate conditions make it very difficult to harvest and maintain land. Due to the lack of funds and poor advancement in farming machinery progress towards development in Africa, many African countries did not have adequate funds to begin any economic development projects.…

    • 757 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The production and distribution of these agricultural produce to the urban markets which are noted to hold enormous blueprints for the rural farmers and improvement in rural livelihood is only possible through rural accessibility. The accessibility situation of the Widikum-Menka Highlands in the North West Region of Cameroon remains a nightmare and cast a lot of doubt on the future of the economic and social development of the sub-region. This is on the premise that the road construction project for this area is perhaps not even contemplated by our socio-economic planners. This is probably why despite the enormous quantity of cash and food crops produced in the country, hunger and poverty still reign supreme in some regions. According to Tetchiada (2004), Cameroon’s food production witnessed a persistent and sustained decline with examples of 1.3% and 1.7% fall in 2002 and 2003 respectively.…

    • 995 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This has not had a very good impact on Burundi’s economy and nutrition. Only 28% of the population has a reliable access to food and the other 58% are chronically malnourished. Over the years, food security has not improved. During harvest time, Burundians still spend around 2 thirds of their money on food but Burundi is one of the most affected with high food prices. Actions by individuals: Individuals can help raise money for Burundi by setting up fundraisers for different organisations, raising awareness, and donating to organisations like ‘World Food Program’.…

    • 890 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays