Inadequate Famine In Africa

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The intense famines in Africa are the result of many interwoven factors, but is the final straw the lack of water? It seems that the areas that can grow crops are over-farmed, and without heat-resistant seeds and irrigation the crops that do survive are not enough. Multiple years of crop failure are the foreshadowing of famine, pulling thousands already living in poverty into the cycle of famine, illness and death. Corrupt governments misuse donated funds to support military and other ventures, keeping the growing population in poverty. Many countries even rely on foreign food donations to support their people. Breaking the cycle of famine, illness and death is difficult, even with resources, and “Drought is the kiss of death at the end of this sad story. It tips people over the brink into starvation.” (Simply, newint.org) If just one of the cyclic causes is corrected, could the people break out of the terrible conditions that now exist.
Inadequate farming leads to inadequate food supply. It seems that plenty of land is used to farm, but due to difficult conditions, poor transportation, and even competition with “free food,” the farmers cannot keep up. This is exhasturbated by the lack of fertilizer, heat-tolerant seeds, irrigation, and climate change. Many of the governments use these conditions to control their people because
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These pesticide-embedded nets were provided to families living near water, but instead of sleeping under them as intended, the people sewed them together to form huge micro-hole fishnets. Unfortunately, this has been devastating on several fronts: the demise of the small/young fish, leaching of pesticide from the nets into the water, leaching of the pesticide from the nets into the fish, and the increase of malaria cases. While no one wants to stop providing the nets, the misuse of the goods has created

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