History Of Quality Assurance

808 Words 4 Pages
Quality assurance originated from the Defense Industry’s need for standards. In order for companies to supply a product to the Ministry of Defense (MoD) a company must write out a procedure to make that product have the MoD inspect that procedure and then ensure that all employees follow that procedure while making that product. (Bureau, 2016 ) The first real strides in quality assurance came in 1966 when the UK lead the world’s first campaign for quality. Their slogan was “Quality is everyone’s business.” At this point in time the only quality checks were coming from the customers doing their own inspections before accepting goods. True movement finally came in 1969 when it was decided that suppliers’ methods should all be assessed against …show more content…
It was aimed at the electronics company in an effort to lower the amount of faulty parts going to customers. Then in 1974 the BSI published the guidelines for quality assurance. This document changed the burden of product inspection from the customer to the supplier. At this time supplier were using 3rd party inspectors to guarantee products to customers and no inspections were being done in house. Finally, in 1979 the BSI organized meetings with industries to set common standards of quality assurance. Key industries agreed to drop their own standards and instead follow only the one set by the BSI. This helped to demonstrated that Industrial production was more controlled and reliable. (Bureau, 2016 ) Though International Organization for Standardization (ISO) was founded in 1947 it was not until now that they really became an international player in the development and implementation of quality management standards. In 1987 ISO published their first quality management standard. The ISO 9000 family of standards provide guidelines and tools for companies to ensure their products meet customers’ requirements and that the quality of products is always improving. (The ISO Story, …show more content…
This version reinforced that the goal of this standard was about “a documented system” not “a system of documents”. Expectations of continual process improvement and tracking customer satisfaction were also made explicit in this vision of the document. A new set of eight core quality management principles, designed to act as a common foundation for all standards relating to quality management, were also introduced; they were: Improved consistency with traceability, Enhanced customer focus, Focused leadership, The involvement of people, A system approach to management, Continual improvement, A factual approach to decision making, and Mutually beneficial supplier relationships. The elements of this version of the document are still very much in use today. (Bureau, 2016

Related Documents