Hip Hop And Basketball Research Paper

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Hip hop artist and basketball players are both performers, who have a rich connection and similar persona, showcasing style, swagger, urbanism, bravado, and coolness. This rich bond was established in 1979; from 1984 to 2009, a new era was conceived, known as “The Dunkadelic Era.”
In 1979, the first mainstream explicit connection between hip-hop and basketball was established. The Sugarhill Gang’s hit song “Rapper’s Delight,” which is commonly referred to as the first mainstream hip-hop song, had lyrics about basketball. “Rapper’s Delight” wasn’t only popular in the United States, but it was an international hit. It quickly spread to a number of countries. Big Bank Hank rapped, “I got a color TV so I can see the Knicks play basketball.” This
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Dre and his beats, Ice Cube absolutely loved the game of basketball as depicted in his iconic song, “It Was a Good Day,” which came out in 1992. In “It Was A Good Day”, Ice Cube said, “Called up the homies and I’m askin y’all, ‘Which park are y’all playing basketball?’ Get me on the court and I’m trouble. Last week, fucked around and got a triple double. Freaking niggas every way, like MJ. I can’t believe today was a good day.” As one can clearly see, Ice Cube was a basketball fan and implied that he had talent by saying he “fucked around and got a triple double”. Even though the previous statement may be false, it shows his knowledge for basketball and how accumulating a triple double requires lots of skill. In addition, this verse shows that Ice Cube’s watched Michael Jordan play and saw the utterly amazing moves he made against his opponents. Growing up in South Central Los Angeles in the seventies and eighties, he became a huge Lakers fan. He grew up playing basketball and had the honor of living out his fantasy when he played in three celebrity games during the NBA All Star weekend. Ice Cube was asked about the relationship between NBA players and rappers and he said,” We all come from the same neighborhood, in a way. We all understand we are a rare breed. To make it out and see a little more than just your environment. I think that right there makes us have something in common. We’re all judged or critiqued by our work that also creates a relationship. And we both admire each other. I think entertainers admire sports figures because you see them at the game and you see them supporting every way you can think of.” It is also important to mention that during the pinnacle of Ice Cube’s rap career, which was in the early 90s, black and white police interactions were extremely hostile. A prime example of this adverse relationship was the unruly, inhumane beatings of Rodney King by the hands of Los Angeles Police Department

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