History Of Hip Hop

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The History of Hip Hop

Today, Hip Hop is a worldwide genre that has swept the globe with passion and soul. What started out as a generally “black culture genre,” is now accepted and done by every race and culture, and even in different languages. Rappers such as Run DMC, Doug E Fresh, Grandmaster Flash, and Kurtis Blow put a stamp on the Hip Hop world and gave it its popularity and momentum. The history of Hip Hop and how people used Hip Hop as a voice for African-Americans, shows how the evolution of Hip Hop is a great thing for the world. What is Hip Hop, and what is the history of it? Hip Hop started out in the 1970’s as a form of “cultural movement” for African-Americans in New York City. “Hip Hop consists of a stylized
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Dj Kool Herc went down in history as the founding father of Hip Hop, in which he discovered it at his sister’s birthday party. He drew in crowds that would watch him play and would dance to “breaks” in the songs he would play. The breaks meant that it was just the beat that would play in the middle of the song. August 11, 1973 is when Dj Kool Herc drew his biggest crowd at his sister’s birthday party. Hip Hop started out in New York City (east coast) and spread to the west coast (California). Rapper’s such as Public Enemy (Flavor Flav, Chuck D and Dj Lord) Snoop Dogg and NWA (Ice Cube, Eazy E, Dr. Dre, MC Ren., The D.O.C., Dj Yella, and Arabian Prince) used Hip Hop and rap to express their frustrations against police brutality and racial oppression against minorities such as African- Americans. “Public Enemy brought an explosion of sonic invention, rhyming virtuosity and social awareness to hip-hop in the 1980s and 1990s. The group’s high points – 1988’s It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back and 1990’s Fear of a Black Planet, stand among the greatest politically charged albums of all time.” Public Enemy became one of the most hated groups in America because they were thought of as dangerous, intimidating, and poisoning the minds of young people with lies, their explicit lyrics, and fearless attitude. They were very outspoken and not afraid to speak their minds. One of the most known records from Public Enemy is 1989’s ‘Fight …show more content…
It is a way to break race barriers and unite humans with a common interest. I believe that it brings together many people of different cultures and races and even people from different continents and countries. The fact that not only black people, but all types of people can love the same raunchy, bass filled, trap music as I can is incredible. I have even had music bring ex boyfriends and I, who are a different race than I am, bring us together and create a platform for us in similarities. I also believe that Hip Hop being well-rounded these days helps people to express themselves in different ways, it helps to connect those who have similar passions and feelings. For example, Hip hop is supposedly not an acceptable type of music for gospel, but in my opinion it is a way to reach broader audiences, and helps others to relate to that style of

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