Herodotus On The War For Greek Freedom: Book Analysis

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In On the War for Greek Freedom, a compelling work comprised of selections from Herodotus’ The Histories, Herodotus recalls many accounts of history that were relayed to him throughout his life and many travels. Upon returning home to Athens, he spent years putting together The Histories, an elaborate account of the Greco-Persian Wars (499-479 B.C.), and is now credited with being “The Father of History.” Herodotus aids the reader in learning all about the primary and secondary reasons and events that occurred, causing tensions to rise between Persia and Greece, resulting in an all-out war. Decisions and actions by the Greeks, Persians, and even the Spartans during times of great friction will be reviewed and analyzed below as well as the inevitability …show more content…
Darius’ mind was made up by 490 B.C.; he had decided to march on Athens. The two forces eventually faced off at Marathon, a small Greek city northeast of Athens. Despite the massive Persian army and naval fleet and the Spartans not coming to help, the Athenians managed to come out on top. Darius made a detrimental mistake when he underestimated the choppy and mountainous topography of Greece. The land of Greece was difficult for the Persians to maneuver and they could never gain any advantage over the Athenians. This was an enormous victory for the Athenians, but they knew Darius’ fury was only greater now that he had been humiliated at Marathon. Next time he would only come back stronger and with a bigger yearning for …show more content…
As Xerxes returned to safety in Persepolis, one of his generals named Mardonius stayed behind to commend the Persian army. Through the winter, Mardonius and the remaining Persian army retreated to Thebes, a medized city in Greece. When Mardonius was ready to fight, he had the Greek forces meet the Persian forces on the flat plains of Thebes, as he had learned not to fight the Greeks in constricted areas. Still, Mardonius made a fatal error. Mistaking a Greek army movement for retreat, he moved his men into the wrong position and the Greeks gained the advantage. Again, the Greeks were victorious and proceeded to kill Mardonius and everyone who had

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