The Persian Wars: Persian Invasion Of Greece

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In the 5th century B.C the Persian Wars raged the Mediterranean in attempt to conquer Greece. The Greek history was a series of battles fought between the Greece and Persia from 499 BC to 479 BC. The Persians were successful at invading but never conquered Greece. The Persian Empire was the largest and most powerful empire in the world and Greece had many cities states including the two main powerful states who were Athens and Sparta. This event all started when a few Greek city states who were under the Persian Empire control revolted against the ruler who at that time was King Darius. Persia was far too big to be only ruled by King Darius, so he appointed regional rulers in which they are called tyrants to represent in his place of king. …show more content…
However, once they were along the coastlines of Chersonese his army was hit by a huge terrible sea storm which resulted in losing just about every man and wrecking ships causing King Darius to send in his second army later for the next invasion of Greece. In 490 BC, the battle of the Marathon was a major battle that caused the second invasion of the Persian Wars. The Persians once again charged forth to punish Athens. The commanders leading this second invasion were Datis and Artaphernes who led about twenty-five thousand men with one eighty ships. The Persians sailed down the coast of Greece and landed at the bay of Marathon, about couple miles away from Athens. While arriving, one of Athens general names Miltiades have been ready for battle and blocked off the Persians ' advance and trapped them on the plains around the bay. With his outnumbered army, he kept the Persians at a stand by with Miltiades sending in runners to Sparta and Plataea to ask for …show more content…
King Xerxes took his huge Persian army and crossed the Hellespont and marched through Thrace and Macedon to Thessaly. The Persian advance was blocked at a narrow pass in the mountains of Thermopylae by a small allied force under King Leonidas of Sparta having the Persians blocked off by an allied army at the canals of Artemisium. At the Battle of Thermopylae, the army was held back by the Persians for seven days before they were attack from the rear by a mountain path causing the allied army to be trapped and annihilated. As the allied hold off two days of Persian attacks at the Battle of Artemisium, they came to hear the news of what was happening at Thermopylae and so they withdrew to Salamis. As the Persians continue to take on Greece, the Persians had reached Athens city and destroyed it and burnt it down to the ground. If Themistocles had not evacuated the city, it would have been a terrible outcome. It is now up to the Athens navy to defect the Persians by having Themistocles go against the battle into the sea where they had the better

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