Sparta Strategic Approach To War: The Peloponnesian War

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The Peloponnesian War by the end of the fifth century before the common era commenced with Sparta’s fear of Athens’ rising power. Sparta a primitive, economically challenged land power, led the independent states. In contrast, Athens an advanced, economically wealthy sea power, oversaw alliance states. Even though they both were state super powers, there was a noticeable difference in their culture, economic background and how they led the subordinate states of government. As well as, Sparta’s and Athens’ strategic approach to war, in the beginning, was dissimilar but in the end, the tables would turn and the Sparta would be victorious.
According to Thucydides, the balance of power often shifted during the war between Sparta and Athens giving
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Sparta now learned Athens’ center of gravity (dependent on allied states for resources) and changed its strategic approach to defeating the Athenians by becoming liberators. Adjusting their military tactics to crush Athens’ centers of gravity, Sparta began to attack and block Athens’ resources. While Brasidas a commander in the Sparta’s army, was spreading the news of Sparta coming to liberate subordinate states throughout Athens’ lands. With the help of the Corinth’s naval fleet, Sparta eventually became a naval sea power and was able to achieve their military objectives of enforcing blockades, acquiring key coastal states and fighting abroad. In addition, Sparta learned how to obtain allied support consequently gaining economic backing and provisions throughout the war. As the conflict continued, the balance of power shifted to Sparta, their ability to execute their revised strategic plan and achieve their sound objectives to break down Athens’ empire was a …show more content…
In order to achieve these objectives, Athens imposed additional war taxes on their allied subordinate states to which many of them refused to pay but did out of fear. At the same time, Athens broke trust agreements with its allied subordinate and coastal states by occupying their lands, placing many them into slavery and killing those who opposed. The new aggressive strategic approach by Athens shifted the balance of power of the war in their favor as they mastered the art of fighting on land. But greed, pride, and overconfidence consumed them and denied Sparta’s request for peace and the war

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