Health Care Rationing Issues

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Due to the increase in chronic diseases and lack of available resources, many patients are referred to physicians and specialists, outside of their states, or sometimes even outside of their country (Doty, 2012). However, even with the established the medical referral programs, patients still face the crucial problem with financing treatment; some patients are being refused treatment because of the large amounts they already owe for their treatments and care (Doty, 2012). Therefore, many officials, especially U.S government officials, viewed rationing of medical services necessary to keep costs at bay.
Among the rationing of medical services is the allocation of resources to terminally ill patients. According to Doty (2012), multiple medical
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Beneficence and autonomy are among the ethical principles associated with allocating health resources; however, that is not the case when resources are scarce and funding is limited; in which case, mainly the poor and middle classes are subjected to health care rationing. Aside from the poor, people most affected by health care rationing are the elderly and disabled persons (Peters, 1995). It is unethical of those with tremendous discretionary power to favor the prestigious over the poor or disabled. However, rationing based on the ability to pay already exists and is completely legal, such as rationing care of Medicaid patients or rationing by insurance companies (Fremgen, 2009). Although some people may believe rationing health care is unethical, it is economically inevitable as the demand for scarce health care resources increase. Therefore, it requires ethical consideration when allocating health …show more content…
However, many politicians claim the unnamed policy is already put into practice.
Another suggested solution is to place high emphasis on prevention and primary care to avoid excessive referrals during critical stages. Furthermore, hospice care is not available to everyone on the, which if made an option, may minimize the health crisis by decreasing the demand of healthcare resources. Nonetheless, evaluating the effectiveness of treatment and cost is essential in allocating resources. Managers are responsible for implementing cost/benefit analysis in order to best utilize the institution’s resources.
Peters (1995) states, “Cost-effectiveness calculations have the appeal of incorporating outcomes research, patient preferences, and expected costs into a rational and potentially sophisticated scheme for maximizing health care outcomes from the available resources” (p. 495). However, cost/benefit analysis alone should not be the primary basis for allocating resources. Managers must also assure health resources are distributed equitably. Nevertheless, a solid solution has not yet to develop as the situation worsens in the

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