Gladiatorial Shows In James Hopkins's Murderous Games By Keith Hopkins

745 Words 3 Pages
How did Ancient Rome maintain a well structured civilization for centuries? According to Keith Hopkins author of “Murderous Games,” an article depicting the life of Romans that tells how violence, discipline, and death were all tools that ensured the people of Rome were obedient. Hopkins presents these components of Roman life by illustrating the Gladiatorial shows and the effect it had on every social class. This paper will be a brief summary and opinion on the Gladiatorial games and how it shaped Roman culture. After a period of almost two centuries when Rome went through a continuous imperial expansion, they controlled a good portion of north-western Europe and the Mediterranean basin. They held about one fifth of the world’s population …show more content…
Children learnt the lesson of what happened to soldiers who were defeated.” The Romans were desensitized to death from early childhood. The children learned that if you are defeated in combat, steal, or break any laws that there is no tolerance, just death. From the beginning of their life, it was just the cultural norm to see criminals dead in the square as a reminder of what happens when you disobey. Public executions were also reminders to slaves, subjects, citizens, and non-combatants that they would pay if they betrayed their …show more content…
It was where the Romans went to watch gladiatorial fights, slaughter of animals, and plenty of criminal executions. The large structures were a big tool in keeping Rome in order, for it provided a form of escapism. If you were a poor Roman, you could go and watch the killings and cheer for blood and death with others. Gladiatorial games went on until the early fifth century AD, even though philosophers and later Christians strongly disapproved. The games continued on with wild-beasts executions until the sixth century. It was proof that even though some people did not agree with the harsh deaths as a form of entertainment, that Rome’s culture was so deeply rooted in violence and death that their voices did little to change Rome. Gladiatorial shows were also the bread and circus that held Rome together for centuries. “Public participation, attracted by the splendor of the show and by distributions of meat...” The city gave the Romans entertainment and free food. It was how Rome kept the 50-60 million people under control. “The Roman people ‘wrote Marcus Aurelius’ is held together by two forces: wheat doles and public shows.” Without the bread and circus that bewitched every social class, it would be probable that Rome wouldn’t have lasted nearly as

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