Freedom In Alice Walker's The Color Purple

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The color purple by Alice Walker
The Color Purple is a novel written in 1982 by Alice Walker. It is a very contrasting work with themes such as violence and silent protest; sexual liberation and sexual oppression. Celie finds her own way in life, not following a path someone else made for her. Celie represents a part of the American Dream, she overcomes misery and gains financial security and freedom. The basis of this book is to make room for the voice of one black woman but it manages to drag you in to the whole array of human emotions and it shows the best and worst of humankind.

The view from which we see the world is quite unique, as it is not only first person but almost prayer like in its letter form. The writing style of The Color Purple is quite unique as well as it is written not only like speech but with a dialect, the dialect of a southern black woman who was pulled from education early on.
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Uttermost it is a story that showcases the triumph of the soul. It is a story about strong women that Celie surrounds herself with throughout the story. Celie speaks for an generation of black women and their experiences. You might say that Walker’s view of African culture is over-simplified and glorified, but in the context it shows an effort to bring black women from different cultures together and show the differences between freedom and colonisation.
It may be said that the men in Celie's world are aggressive, abusive and violent and that it reinforces racial stereotyping against black men. It is important to note that they also were brought up in a racist and sexist environment. Some of the characters show signs of transformation later in the book by engaging in “women's work” among other things. One of the major feminist themes in this book is that only once traditional gender roles are gone may both women and men find freedom and

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