Compare And Contrast Bouucher Vs Me

Decent Essays
Kara Young
Political Thought
Mr. Scott Harris
October 19, 2017
Boucher VS. Me If the colonies would have listened to Boucher, would we be the United States today? The United States would have never been, and we would still be under England's rule. Jonathan Boucher believed that being under England's rule was God's plan. He said that every man should obey the government because that is what God wants. He says that when Christians disobey ordinances from the government, they disobey God as well. My question to Boucher would be if that was true then why so many English did people flee England for religious freedom? Why did England not want to give the colonies representation in parliament? England wanted to keep the colonies under their rule
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In Common Sense, Paine argued that the fight to gain independence was urgent and necessary no matter the consequences, because of how the colonies were tired of being heavily taxed when at the time Britain was not even taxing their own citizens. Paine believed whole-heartedly that war with Britain to gain independence was completely justified and inescapable, because being free had to be better than being under the king's rule. Throughout Common Sense, Paine explained in depth all the benefits of rising up against Britain as quickly as possible. The pamphlet immediately dives into an attack on hereditary succession and the monarchical system of the British government. Hereditary successors were born just like any other baby in the world. Just because their dad was good king does not mean that they will have the same passion for their people as their dad. That is why the people should elect who they want to represent them. Paine described the government as having the power to protect people against their own evil, life, liberty, and property. He believed that society has the right to govern and protect themselves until too much harm was caused and only then should the government be allowed to intervene. Paine advocated for a representative democracy where each colony would have a nearly equal weight so that no state would have too much power over another because the government can get too …show more content…
God's work is not excited domestic insurrections amongst the people and endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers. When the Declaration of Independence was being composed it included the significance of life and liberty, the notion that all men are created equal, and the dissolution of the government. The most important part of the Declaration of Independence is this infamous line "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" (Jefferson). I feel that the biggest reason why America needs its own form of government because it is specifically protecting LIFE, LIBERTY, and PROPERTY. Jefferson writes, "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, and that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights (Jefferson) He is saying in this line that God is saying it is our right to be free. The intent of the Declaration of Independence was separation it also attempted to embrace that government itself was not evil, unlike the monarch of Great Britain. Different and more effective forms of government would allow for a stronger established independence. The people must consent to be

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