Four Asian Tigers Case Study

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The four Asian Tigers: Hong Kong, South Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan have swiftly expanded through economics, industrialization, technology, and education. These countries were the first to transform from a developing nation into a newly industrialized nation (Cateora, 327). These regions, also known as the “East Asian miracles”, highly influenced the creation of China’s economy and trade relations. The four Asian Tigers’ economic boost and trade alliances, motivated the U.S. Trade Representative to develop a free trade agreement. Singapore and South Korea were the first to consent to the U.S. Trade Representative's offer and become apart of the free trade agreement (Cateora, 328). In turn, this arrangement has expanded not only China’s growth but has helped to develop surrounding nations as well.
How did the four Asian Tigers rise out of a developing state? In general, each of the nation's government concentrated on economic expansion and knew a motivated and educated society played an important role in their development (Cateora, 329). Considering China is broken up into regions and each requires its own expansion and strategy, respectively, the regions had their own methods of development (Cateora, 319).
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Perhaps, having full autonomy from the People’s Republic of China, allowed Hong Kong to adapt their ruling according to their “social and economic systems, lifestyle, and rights and freedom”. This helped to create a more synonymous region. Hong Kong quickly raised from their financial crisis in 1997 by investing in “factories and infrastructure” (Cateora, 322). In addition, according to “Development and Globalization” Hong Kong grew their economy through their textile industry. Then, they used this revenue to improve infrastructure, education, and healthcare (Development and

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