Imperialism In China

Good Essays
Eve Orbach
10H1
Social Studies

China, Japan, the Middle East, and Africa were regions in which the influence of the Europeans was eventually greatly felt. All of these regions were at first reluctant to join with the European ways in matters such as culture and trade, but eventually succumbed to the pressure to join the Europeans due to various reasons such as military pressure from the Europeans or the pressure to succeed and evolve by modernizing as a country. The Europeans always succeed in achieving what they desired, whether it was trading with or obtaining power over the aforementioned states. At first China repeatedly refused to receive the French, British, American, and Russian officials into their harbor to trade. The Chinese remained
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Population was increasing but food supply was not. People were discouraged so they turned to opium for relief. The Chinese began to rebel against the Qing Dynasty. The Chinese wanted peace and for poverty to become abolished, so the people started the Taiping Rebellion, which was led by Hong Xiuquan. Hong Xiuquan and his army successfully rebelled against the Qing Dynasty. The Qing Imperial troops and British and French forces attacked the Taiping. After this the Taiping government was brought down by these attacks and many people died in the rebellion. The many rebellions and external pressure to modernize and interact from foreign powers in China led to the reformation of China which involved self-strengthening China, and this self-strengthening had a mixed outcome. European countries took advantage of China’s weakened state and tried to attack China. Treaty negotiations that were a result of the attacks on China lessened China’s power continuously. Japan and many of Europe’s major powers had a lot of control over China. They controlled investment and trade in …show more content…
The Industrial Revolution was spreading and many European countries were searching for more fuel for their factories and production. A lot of Europe’s most powerful regions viewed certain parts of Africa as a marketplace and a source for materials, and this resulted with imperialism in Africa. The Europeans thought that they were superior to the Africans because the Europeans believed in Social Darwinism; this was another reason why the Europeans wanted to take over Africa. The Europeans wanted to control every aspect of Africa for their benefit, including the political, economical, and personal lives of the Africans. Eventually the Africans had the desire to modernize. Soon after the Europeans took over Africa with their extremely powerful army. After their defeat the Egyptians were colonized by the Europeans, and the colonization had mostly negative effects on the

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