Narrative Techniques In The Film Jaws

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Jaws is a classic American thriller film released in 1975 that had swept the nation with its iconic story about a ginormous man-eating shark attacking the poor citizens of Amity Island. Cue creepy, terrifying shark music. An action! Duunnn dun…. dun…dunn…dun..dun..dun..dun.. Jaws is more than a successful film, it is a film that is renowned with the title of “film history’s highest grossing movie of all time” (Gottlieb 11). However, aside from begin a timeless hit the process of making the film was far from smooth sailing, as described in the novel The Jaws Log written by Carl Gottlieb. To safely say Jaws had gotten the better of them.
Before the idea of Jaws surfacing as becoming a world-renowned and beloved film, aspiring novelist and writer,
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As previously learned locations are the setting in which the characters thrive in and whether it is a physical location or a sound stage, locations are prime. However, while “shooting on location can add realism [to] a scene, [it] also increases the cost and complicate[s] logistics”, which is exactly what happened (Tomaric 105). The poor Jaws production cast and crew never had a break. From the start, the act of finding a location already had heightened requirements: “summer resort feel, 25-30 feet of water with sandy bottoms big enough to hold the built shark”, these became numerous limits for the production. And once Martha’s Vineyard was presumed the location for the film, there were problems with logistics and payment in booking places to stay when the heightened summer crowds arrived. Consequently, it is important to note as mentioned in the Filmmaking book, it advises against using “locations one cant reasonably control during the shoot”, including shooting in public, (check), noisy location (check), and the jackpot winner, weather (check, check)(Tomaric …show more content…
To start the casting process in terms of the shark was quite different to traditional pictures, it was more of a question of dependability on the art and props department than it was a directorial matter. Secondly, and probably the most significant difference was the issue of locations. As in the lectures on location, one was advised from using areas that couldn’t be reasonably controlled, and for the production of Jaws it was evident that Martha’s Vineyard had gotten the best of them. As the weather had been one of the main factors in why the production went 40 days over schedule and 1.5 million over in budget. Thirdly, since production had taken way longer than expected, months to be exact, the cast and crew were overworked and tired, furthermore this corresponds back to what we learned in the production lecture, that people will loose themselves. Everyone in the cast and crew had been in a waging war with time, essentially a waiting game with nature, as they would “go to sea, wait out the wind and weather, the sailboats, the crew, and special effects”, not to mention the lingering game in reference to the separation from family and friends (Gottlieb 171). In closing, the production of Jaws was a “sea full of swimming men and small boats maneuvering to effect rescue”(Gottlieb 166). And while Jaws turned out to be a smashing hit,

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