Movie Brats Case Study

Improved Essays
“The 1970s marks Hollywood’s most significant formal transformation since the conversion to sound film and is the defining period separating story telling modes of the studio era and contemporary Hollywood”
Name of the dude who said that
An era that started off by breaking new ground and later become what would be a profitable era of block buster entertainment, New Hollywood is recognised as a period where some of the most revered directors rose and some of the most memorable films ever to come out of the American film industry were made, all thanks to a new generation of film makers that would later be known as the ‘Movie Brats’. But before Jaws and Star Wars, before the millions of dollars that were made, the box office records smashed, and
…show more content…
In 1951 NBC would become the first nationwide TV network and within three years NBC would achieve the highest number of audience in television’s short history with the broadcast of the Academy Awards. Foreign films were also making head way further weakening Hollywood studios. With the continued decline of theatre sales studios looked towards the threat as a source of revenue and began producing television content. Eventually studios found themselves creating more television content than feature films and the line between the two mediums began to blur. Movie studios like Warner Brothers and MGM began to sell their pre-1950s film catalogues and by 1956 television would broadcast its first feature length film The Wizard of Oz (1939).
Hollywood eventually lost control of their contracted stars as they began making their way into television programs and vice versa.
Television sets continued to make their way into living rooms as they became more affordable, no longer just the luxury of the rich. By 1954 the number of homes with a television set increased 55.7% and by 1958 it had increased to
…show more content…
Feature films became more colourful to exploit the limitations of black and white television sets and by the mid-50s at least half of all feature films made were in colour. Another limitation of the television set was the 4:3 aspect ratio, so films became bigger in scale both on and off screen as the pictures got wider and the equipment needed to project them became more complex, sometimes using up to three projectors together to display the wideness. However these super wide films would not last as they were extremely expensive to produce which led to studios abandoning the 65mm/70mm format and moved back to the cheaper

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Throughout the 1920’s cinema became established as the most popular and profitable mass media, and this continued until the 1960s. Historian A.J.P Taylor famously described it as “the essential social habit of the age”. People went to the movies as their main leisure activity. The social experience of cinema going was often an escape from what could be very difficult social conditions and the rise in cinema attendances during and just following World War Two were up to 31m per week in the UK alone, suggest this is a major factor. World War Two increased Hollywood’s dominance world-wide as most other countries had to severely cut back production and Hollywood films provided the escapist entertainment the audiences demanded across Europe and America.…

    • 1455 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The average film budget was usually over 18 million. But the average ticket price was at the beginning of the 1980’s $3 and at the end of the decade rose to $4 and over. The reason the cost was so high when producing a film was because after the 70s, the films in the 80s were “Less experimental and original, but more formulaic…”. A new special effect called the (CGI) technique cause a burst of films; including Steven Spielburg’s ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)’, and George Lucas’ ‘Return of the Jedi (1983)’ these were labeled as “Blockbusters”. There were many movies in the ‘80s that hit it big and were a huge success.…

    • 750 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    1950s Popular Culture

    • 444 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Along with visual culture there co-existed the autiditory culture propagated by music and radio. Theatre and performance styles developed slowly in the 1950s but did not flourished until late in the decade. The sudden growth of the music industry can be attributed to the changing consumer tastes and an expanding market for records and live events. The record industry had a setback during the war time because of production restriction but the case suddenly improved just one year and after the launch of 33rpm twelve inch disc and the 45rpm single by 1949. The five giants Decca, Capitol, RCA-Victor, Columbia and ABC-Paramount quickly capitalised on the increase in disposable income especially among middle-class teenagers.…

    • 444 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In fact, it is said that the Great Depression actually amplified movie attendance as it gave people an escape from the cold and the bitter reality of daily life. ,iv Film attendance reached an all-time high in 1930; one year after the start of the Great Depression.vi At that time, 65% of the population went to the movies each week.i However, with unemployment reaching an all-time high in 1933, movie theater attendance eventually began to drop. In response, theaters dropped prices and Hollywood produced light-hearted films that featured messages of hope and inspiration. Even at its lowest point in the 1930s, 40% of the population still attended movies weekly.i Movie attendance began to rebound around 1938, at the start of WWII. At that time, movie theaters were often attended to get news and updates about the war.…

    • 1359 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Sound On Film Analysis

    • 1001 Words
    • 4 Pages

    By 1930, most of the main studios were ready for use using American or German systems. Great Britain also imitated American practices as a means of building up its film industry. They ran into financial issues with converting to sound primarily because of silent films having little value in the big first-run cinema; however, synchronizing sound helped provide a series of historical films that Britain filmmakers hoped would gain entry in the productive American market. Japanese cinema focused on “talkies,” and were one of the last to convert to synchronizing sound in movies. Again because of the Depression,…

    • 1001 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Film Industry Analysis

    • 1094 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Because they told stories without words, they appealed to the large, mostly unable to read or write (immigrants) population in the United States. After 1900, film became more of a middle class event. Classical Hollywood Cinema started in 1930 and this was a transition from silent movies to movies with sound. The Classical Hollywood Cinema caused a big fuss because it made actors/actresses who were doing silent films lose their jobs. From 1980 to now, the Contemporary period has bought and merged many movie studios.…

    • 1094 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The relationship between the Hollywood film industry and the emerging television industry in the early period did not develop seamlessly as the struggle of releasing some control in production and marketing caused both industries to be uneased. The Hollywood film had to overhaul the entire system that brought them success for decades, a change the ways they did business by sharing executive control with the television industry. The 1950s was one of the most turbulent periods in the history of motion pictures and television. During the decade, as Hollywood 's most powerful studios and independent producers shifted into TV production, TV replaced film as America 's principal postwar culture industry. The relationship between the two industries…

    • 1046 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Before the 1940s, Hollywood and the Studio System, was one that carried the American Film Industry to new heights and brought on different visions from aspiring filmmakers and film companies. What was once just a convenient place to escape the grasp and control of The Trust, became the place to be during the 1920s. Hollywood was thriving with the system it created. The Big Five film companies created movies that made those years the Golden Age of Hollywood. But of course a system that gave the majority of the power to only a handful of top companies, wasn’t going to last long.…

    • 1905 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    even decades after its release, Star Wars has only grown in popularity since its release in 1977. The Special effects in Star Wars were groundbreaking at the time of its release and still look good today. To achieve these effects, John Dykstra and his team had to create everything from scratch. “Star Wars was the first big budget blockbuster…

    • 829 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Star Wars: The Next Hit “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far way…” The opening lines of every Star Wars Episode can be quoted by most its viewers. This speaks to the impact that this movie franchise has had upon Americans. Even George Lucas could not have predicted the major success of his films. Forbes Magazine contributor Scott Mendelson believes that, “Star Wars hit such a chord precisely because it was an original and precisely because it was unlike anything that was currently available in the marketplace (Mendelson).” When Disney purchased Lucasfilms, they announced that new Star Wars films would be made. Star Wars: The Force Awakens is the seventh installment in the Lucasfilm lineup and the first full feature Star Wars movie to be made by Disney (StarWars.com).…

    • 1519 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays