Fear Of Ambition In Shakespeare's The Tragedy Of Julius Caesar

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Fear. It propels many thoughts and actions, especially in Shakespeare’s, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar. As the senators fear Caesar and his ever growing power, they conspire to bring him down. Partly because of fear, yet also motivated by personal motives and jealousy, they murder Caesar in cold blood. This fear of his ambition, partnered with conspiracy, cause much harm to many people. In history as well, there are many times in which fear and conspiracy come together to bring down the supposed powerful one. In the play, the aftermath of the conspiracy is the worst, ending in a civil war as the remaining fight for power, the only thing they are truly willing to kill for. As portrayed in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, fear of ambition goes …show more content…
At the beginning of his political ventures, he secured the command of the provinces of Cisalpine Gaul, Illyricum, and Transalpine Gaul (Betty Nye Quinn 584). His ambition is clearly portrayed as he conquers more land, bringing more people under his unyielding control. While running for the consulship, he was even given the right to stand, even though he was not in Rome (Betty Nye Quinn 585). This alone gives reason to the fear of the senate towards his unending ambition. While some of them feared for their own power in the government, others, like Brutus, feared for the people of the Republic and their safety. Caesar’s ambition, which has a negative connotation in the play, lead, “some of the senators [to] believe that Caesar [was] an overly ambitious man, making him a candidate for assassination” (Anne Marie Hacht 345). In the end, ambition and conspiracy are seen in the play as well as in history, wreaking havoc as they lead to the death of Caesar, a supposedly too ambitious man, as well as many other people in the …show more content…
Fear of ambition paired with conspiracy cause death as well, yet only to the people that have allegedly harmed the conspirators directly or the cause that the conspirators support. As seen in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, the fear of Caesar’s ambition lead to the formation of a conspiracy and the murder of Caesar. There were many valid and invalid reasons behind the fear, such as jealousy and the greed for political power. Cassius, motivated by his need to be superior to everyone, helped to form the conspiracy. On the other hand, Antony, a loyal friend to Caesar, was motivated to take revenge for the assassination in order to gain political power. Fate aided in tying together the conspiracy and fear, using them to motivate each other and further the cause of Caesar’s

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