Sulla And Caesar's Contribution To The Fall Of The Roman Republic

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The Roman Republic is traditionally dated from 509 BC to 27 BC, becoming established with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom and was destroyed with the development of the Roman Empire. When considering the fall of the Roman Republic, it is clear that the reorganisation of the army, particularly through the actions of Marius, Sulla and Caesar, contributed greatly to the disempowerment of the Senate and therefore the Republic. Through the undoubtedly instrumental Marian reforms, the Roman social and militant structure was altered permanently, a design that was manipulated and built upon through the course of Sulla and Caesar’s political careers. Through all of this factors, it is unquestionable that the changing composition of the Roman Army …show more content…
Although in the short term his reforms were instrumental in the growth and success of the Roman military, resulting in the continued success of the Romans in battle (Wikipedia: Marian Reforms, 2015), his reforms largely threatened the basis on which the Senate flourished on. Although anonymous, this source can be considered fairly reliable due to the meticulous sourcing within the website, as well as corroborating and accurate information. Ignoring the census, he introduced the Roman landless masses into the army. This now allowed men that had no property to be assessed in the census to join the military in an attempt to gain status otherwise excluded from them (Wikipedia: Marian Reforms, 2015). The abolishment of any property requirements, Marius opened the ranks to the capite censii, or the head count, gaining support from the disenfranchised majority. As stated in the Constitution of the Roman Republic Wikipedia page, (date) generals were able to gain loyalty through charisma, promises and bribes, stating that, “once the general and officers had a unity of purpose, the rigid discipline of the military meant the troops would follow.” Marius introduced this concept through his promise of retirement benefits, land grants and the granting of Roman citizenship for Italian allies if they fought alongside them in the Roman army. It is suggested in the Marian Reforms Wikipedia …show more content…
Stevens, 2003), Caesar was able to exercise significant political control over Rome. The view that it was, “simpler to follow the blast of a trumpet than the swirl of contradictory obligations that had always characterized civilian life,” (Holland T, 2003) made up the framework of Caesar’s ability to gain power. His rise to dictatorship threatened the system which the Republic survived on, specifically the strict set of checks and balances that disabled any possibility for a sole individual to gain absolute power. His ability to dominate the Senate, magistrate and the people of Rome, threatened the Senate in particular, stated in the

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