How Did Augustus Characterize Rome

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Much of any political leader’s success can be attributed to public image. Without the support of those under one’s power, one’s authority does not last long. As Augustus finalized Rome’s transition from a republic to an empire, his public image through military success, information on his private life, and various forms of propaganda—and the subsequent support from the people—was the basis of his power. A leader’s performance while commanding an army was an essential part in winning loyalty from both the senate and the people. A great deal of respect was earned through success in battle, and was equated to a man’s ability to lead in government. Prominent figures like Pompey and Caesar were so successful because of the abilities they showed early in their careers. Augustus did not immediately establish himself as a threat during the battles against Caesar’s assassins. In fact, when he and Antony led their army against Brutus and Cassius in 42 BC, Augustus “disgraced himself in the first of the two actions by taking to his tent with illness” (Potter 172). Surely, if this weakness …show more content…
In fact, after the battle, a coin was minted with Augustus on it carried a message: “the extra-constitutional authority of the triumvirs was at an end now that the power of Antony was no more” (Potter 175). Without the support from his colleagues and the willingness of the people to embrace the changes he enforced, Augustus would not have been able to transform the Roman Republic into an Empire, and change the course of its history. Many factors contributed to Augustus’s power, but its true basis stemmed from the support of the people and his loyal followers. Through military successes and propaganda, his public image played a key role in winning these devotees, and allowed him to establish himself as

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