Tiberius's Military Reforms

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Tiberius’s brother Gaius met the same fate tragically ten years later. Gaius 's reforms were centered on three major areas of Rome; judiciary, economics and the military. The two major judicial reforms concerned magistrates. The first item of reform was to prohibit magistrates who had been deposed from holding office a second time. The second and final part of the judicial reforms was to give the People the ability to prosecute any magistrate who had exiled any citizen without a trial (this was thought to have been as a result of what happened to supporters of Tiberius). Economically speaking, Gaius worked to expand the land reforms set in motion by his late brother. He planned large oversea colonies to provide for thousands of Roman citizens …show more content…
Gaius 's military reforms came through the passage of a law known as Lex Militaris which required the government to clothe and equip Roman soldiers without deductions from their pay, shortened the term of military service, and made it illegal to draft boys who were under the age of seventeen. In addition to these reforms, Gaius symbolically mocked the power of the Senate through changing how speeches were physically delivered. Usually when delivering speeches in the forum, one would face the right, in the direction of the Senate House. Gaius, instead, turned his gaze left, effectively putting his back to the Senate and faced the forum. Through the implementation of his own reforms and the continuation of his brothers, Gaius amassed significant political power and personally oversaw the implementation of each new institution created through those reforms. He was elected consul in 122 BC despite not being a candidate or even running, but simply by the sheer will of the people. Despite this popularity Gaius suffered the same fate as his brother, due to his conflict with the …show more content…
Sulla was born in 138 BCE and first served under Garius Marius as Quaestor. Like Pompey, he too also achieved notoriety in the Social War which angered Marius who wanted to use the opportunity to achieve some fame for himself. This led to Sulla’s election to Consul and he was given command of the Roman Legion against Mithradates VI in the first Mithradactic war (88-84 BCE). Marius used Sulla’s absence to try to seize the Consulship and command from Sulla through conspiring with some members of the Senate. Marius’s actions set the stage for a turbulent period of political strife and discord. Sulla heard of Marius’s actions and promptly returned to Rome with his army and drove Marius from Rome while also purging Marius 's supporters as well. This was an astonishing turn of events because never before had a Roman led a group of Romans against their own city. It was unprecedented. Sadly, after Sulla left to once more finish the war, Marius returned and began a reign of terror in which he seized the seventh consulship and enacted his revenge against Sulla’s supporters by disposing of them and confiscating their property. Marius died a few weeks into his consulship, but his followers formed the Marian party and still held a tight grip on Rome. Sulla, meanwhile, was engaged in a long and brutal siege with Athens, a supporter of Mithradates VI, which ended in 86 BCE with Sulla

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