Julius Caesar Tragedy Analysis

1100 Words 4 Pages
Drama Analysis Essay In literature, the character’s tragic flaw, ultimately brings about their downfall. Regardless of the intention or character’s best efforts, the tragic flaw will bring about the destruction of the character. A tragedy is a play that shows the fall of a noble hero from high standing to a disaster because of a character flaw. In Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar and Brutus go through this during the course of the play. Julius Caesar’s flaw of arrogance and dynastic ambition, Brutus’s rigid idealism, poor judgements, and naivety are the tragic flaws that ultimately lead to their downfalls. In this play, Julius Caesar’s tragic flaw is arrogance and his dynastic ambition. He believed that he was superior …show more content…
He was the only major character in the play that fully committed to making his decisions through a moral and ethical code. Even though he committed himself to principle, this repeatedly causes him to make miscalculations. He makes decisions that unconsciously hypocritical. He naively believed that everything that people told him was true. When the conspirators wrote fake letters to him, became conflicted with himself. He had to choose between his loyalty to Rome and his loyalty to his friend. Since he naively believed the letters were real, he decided that his loyalty would go to Rome and joined the conspirators. Once he joined them, they used him to kill Caesar. His tragic flaw of poor judgement showed when he was taken advantage of by Antony. Cassius had suggested that Brutus all the conspirators to kill Antony too so that they could prevent any future conflict since Antony had worked for Caesar, but Brutus did not listen and let him live. Wanting to reduce the amount of violence, he ignores Cassius’s advice again and instead allows Antony …show more content…
He had strict moral ethical beliefs that guided his life and his desire to protect Rome, but he then becomes hypocritical when he aids in the assassination of Caesar. Because of his idealism, he began to struggle with his justification with killing his friend. He tries to justify the murder by his attempt to ritualize the assassination of Caesar, and then makes the poor judgement of believing that the citizens of Rome will consider the assassination in detached or abstract terms. He even shows his struggle when he wears a false face when giving the toast to hide his anguish he begins to feel for his involvement with the conspiracy. In his scene

Related Documents