Insulin Resistance Syndrome Research Paper

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Introduction
What is Insulin Resistance Syndrome?
Insulin Resistance Syndrome is a proven facilitator of an alarming number of chronic illnesses in the United States. In order to understand the severity of insulin resistance syndrome, it is vital to recognize the important role that insulin plays in the human body (Reaven, 1995). Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas which is instrumental in the body’s use of digested food for energy. The body’s digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates consumed into glucose which enters the bloodstream. Insulin aids the cells in the body to absorb and use glucose for energy. Insulin resistance occurs when the body’s cells do not react appropriately to insulin which makes it difficult to absorb glucose
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Other contributing factors include ethnicity, genetics, age, medications, hormones, other illnesses, and lifestyle factors (Kahn & Flier, 2000). People who have insulin resistance usually have no obvious symptoms and can live with the condition without knowing about it for many years. There are, however certain factors that can be recognized by health care providers as a risk for developing Insulin Resistance Syndrome such as a sedentary lifestyle, excess weight, a family history of diabetes or gestational diabetes, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol, polycystic ovarian syndrome or other fertility-related concerns, a darkening of the skin around the neck, knees, knuckles, or armpits, and a history of cardiovascular disease diseases (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 2014). Insulin Resistance Syndrome is diagnosed by obtaining bloodwork which includes fasting glucose levels, insulin levels, glucose tolerance testing, and a hemoglobin A1C test to better understand the individual’s ability to produce and use insulin (Haffner, Valdez, Hazuda,, Mitchell, Morales, & Stern, 1992). When left untreated, insulin resistance can lead to many of the chronic diseases that plague the United States. This review of literature will focus on the link between insulin …show more content…
NASH is characterized by an accumulation of fat (steatosis) along with the deterioration, inflammation, thickening and scarring of the liver which may, in time, lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer (Jansen, 2004). Insulin resistance syndrome is the only metabolic syndrome consistently associated with NASH as it has been proven to contribute to the build-up of free fatty acids in the liver due to an increased output of insulin from the pancreas (Das & Kar,

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