Ethical Teachings Of Buddhism

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The worship and teachings of Buddhism has had a significant impact on individuals and the wider Buddhist community. Buddhism claims to be a way of life that avoids the extremes of denial and indulgence and proposes a middle way. This is a key tenet that all adherents must follow, in order to achieve nirvana, the ultimate goal for all Buddhists. Subsequently, there are many teachings and practices which guide Buddhist followers on how to live a life in attaining nirvana, that affect people individually and society as a whole. The significant practice of Temple Puja and the teachings by the Buddhist texts, principles, the XIVth Dalai Lama and the Buddha himself, guide and outline adherents on issues that may impact upon their path of enlightenment …show more content…
The issue of abortion is a key concern of bioethics that affects individuals and the wider community, which is strongly influenced by Buddhist ethical and moral teachings. Abortion, which is the artificial ending of the life of a foetus in the womb, is commonly seen as immoral by Buddhists but is a crucial problem faced in today’s society for individuals. Abortion goes against the 1st precept to not kill or harm any living beings. Buddhists believe that life begins at conception so consequently the act of abortion, is indeed killing life. Therefore abortion goes against the notion of ahimsa, the teaching of nonviolence towards all sentient life forms. One must not intentionally end the life of any living things under any circumstances, which shows regard for their life. This can be expressed through “...The new being, bearing the karmic identity of a recently deceased individual, is therefore as entitled to the same moral respect as an adult human being.” - Damien Keown 2004. Hence killing a foetus or even any other life form will generate bad karma for individuals which making it more difficult to break the …show more content…
Temple Puja is a sacred place or site where an image of Buddha is present and is meant as a place of worship and offering. Because Buddhists do not believe in a deity, worship is seen as a way of offering thanks and asking for guidance to the Buddha, who is an role model for all adherents. Although there are such activities like chanting, reciting prayers, lighting incense, etc. The significant practice enables Buddhists to engage in intense concentration, removing any distractions for complete focus. As apparent by Dogen, ‘[Proper meditation is] single-minded intense sitting, practising repentance…” Temple Puja allows individuals to truly meditate, reminding them about key teachings, heavily focusing on right mindfulness and right concentration, hence following the eightfold path which leads to the cessation of Dukkha (Suffering) as part of the four noble truths and walking the middle way. Also, it engages the wider community to take part in such activities that may not help with proper self meditation but rather build a sense of fellowship and unity. This is clear where chanting is another feature of Temple Puja in which Chanting lines from the Pali Canon such as, “I take refuge in the Buddha, the Dharma and the Sangha”

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