Dcog Theory Of Learning

1030 Words 4 Pages
According to Merriam Webster Dictionary (1828), learning is defined as the attainment of knowledge or skills through study, experience, or being taught. Generally, people define learning as what we learn as a result of things that happen to us. For example, we learned not to tell lies because we can get in trouble, we learned that thunder comes after lightning, and we learned to cook from watching the steps demonstrated to us. Proof that we have actually learned these things come from acquired apposite reactions to them. We try to prevent telling lies, when lightning strikes, we protect our ears, and we cook. Learning is obtaining relatively lasting modification in behavior through experience. We go through things and learn to change our activities …show more content…
Edwin Hutchins, a cognitive psychologist and former professor at at the University of California at San Diego, is one of the key developers of distributed cognition (Bell & Winn, 2000). Distributed cognition allows the student to have more control. Simply put, distributed cognition, or Dcog, is student centered and contends that learning is achieved in environments where learners take part in a methodically intended learning environment that encourages interaction with its participants (Bell & Winn, 2000). Dcog encourages learning in a system or group of learners where interaction occurs. As a result of the interactions, cognition takes place. This requires the distribution of intellectual activity amongst the parts and contributors of this system, which can include other artifacts, people or tools such as media or technology (Bell & Winn, …show more content…
Waks frown at the use of technology in the school system. In his 1995 book entitled Technology 's School: The Challenge to Philosophy, Leonard argues against the use of technology in education. Waks contends that education is in fact, a type of technology that influences the world and is in turn influenced by it (Puelles, 1997). Waks describes technology as a toll that students become dependent upon, rather than using their own cognitive abilities. While Waks and Hutchins have their opposing views, they both agree that the process of learning in influenced by

Related Documents