Dystopia In Animal Farm By George Orwell

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“All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.” This quote was written by George Orwell in his book Animal Farm, one of Orwell’s most famous novels. Throughout history the subject of a distant dystopia has always been explored in many works of literature. The possibility of humanity falling into a bleak and totalitarian society has always fascinated readers. These stories and themes can come to define an author and their legacy as a writer. There is no greater example of this seen in the works of George Orwell. His works have come to represent the dystopian genre and have had a monumental effect on American society. Nineteen Eighty-Four and Animal Farm are the most popular of Orwell’s works and have come to greatly impact …show more content…
In the online biography George Orwell states “George Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair at Motihari, Bengal, India. His father, Richard Walmesley Blair, was a minor customs official in the opium department of the Indian Civil Service.” (1998). The biography also claims “When Orwell was eight years old, he was sent to a private preparatory school in Sussex. He later claimed that his experiences there determined his views on the English class system.” (George Orwell, 1998). Orwell's experience would come to shape his beliefs for the rest of his life this is seen in “He had wanted to become a writer since his adolescence, and he had come to believe that the Imperial Police was in this respect an unsuitable profession. Later evidence also suggests that he had come to understand the imperialism which he was serving and had rejected it.” (George Orwell, 1998). After leaving the Imperial Police Orwell would make his first attempt at becoming a writer “ It seems clear that his main objective was to establish himself as a writer, and the choice of Paris was characteristic of the period. Orwell wrote two novels, both lost, during his stay in Paris, and he published a few articles in French and English. After stints as a kitchen porter and dishwasher and a bout with pneumonia, he returned to England toward the end of 1929.” (George Orwell, 1998). Orwell would continue to write in England “In the spring of 1936 …show more content…
Theresa Johnson claims “The writer was a socialist, yet somehow he managed to see the destructive tendencies of 20th-century political movements, such as communism and Stalinism, that had seduced so many others.” (2003). Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty-Four had greatest effect on American culture out of the rest of his novels, Jennifer Schuessler writes “During the Super Bowl, Apple aired its memorable (and much parodied) ''1984'' commercial, directed by Ridley Scott. And a movie version of the novel, directed by Michael Radford, was rushed into production.” (2017). The novel has changed Americans perception of their own government, Schuessler claims “As 1984 itself approached, the news media ran numerous articles comparing Orwell's vision to reality. Shortly after the year arrived, the Soviet political journal New Times issued its own propaganda strike, in an article charging that Orwell's vision had come true -- ''in the United States, under a 'Big Brother' named Ronald Reagan.” (2017). Orwell’s work still influences American culture today “Orwell's vision of a world of total surveillance may have had its fullest, if most ambiguous, realization in reality TV. ''Big Brother'' and its spinoffs survived a copyright challenge in 2000 from the owner of the film rights to the novel, and has survived to provide memorable moments, including in November 2016, when contestants on ''Big Brother Over the

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