Discrimination In The LGBT Community

1087 Words 5 Pages
Imagine your son or daughter coming home with a very worn out stance. Their head is down, and they go up to their room. You just think they had a rough day, so you do not pay any attention to it. Dinner time rolls around, so you go to their room to procure them, but you see an empty bottle of pills. They will not wake up. You look on their desk after looking at their body, finding a note explaining everything. What would you do? Almost half the world is accepting of the LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender) community. However, there are still a numerous amount of cases dealing with LGBT suicides due to bullying and discrimination. These cases are a nightmare. This is why the LGBT community needs to have more rights because it makes equality …show more content…
Many LGBT teenagers do not have control over their coming out experience. Some of them are perceived as LGBT and may already be experiencing bullying at school. Others are outed by a friend, either accidentally or deliberately (Wilcox 39). Many teenagers say that after they come out as LGBT they are happier and also more confident-even if it means they were bullied or harassed. Coming out makes it easier to access LGBT resources, make like-minded friends, and seek help when needed (Wilcox 7). Congressman Polis is strongly committed to ending discrimination of all kinds. Student non-discrimination act: Our nation’s schools should be a place of study and of social growth, preparing youth for the challenges of an ever-changing world (Polis). President Obama’s executive order on LGBT Workplace Discrimination prohibits federal contractors and subcontractors from discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation, additionally, gender identity …show more content…
Out of the 594,000 same-sex couple households, 115,000 reported having children. Eighty-four percent of these households contained own children of the household. In comparison, ninety-four percent of opposite-sex married couple households with children reported living with their own children. Among both same-sex spousal and unmarried partner households, family units consisting of children of the partner or through adoption are common (Lofquist). Between eight and ten million children are being raised in gay and lesbian households. In 1997, there were qualified adoptive families (including single parents) available for only twenty percent of these children. It is also estimated that approximately ten percent of the United States population-or twenty-five million individuals-are homosexual

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