Analysis Of Meditation Three By Rene Descartes

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In “Meditation Three” Rene’ starts out with an attempt to contemplate the existence of God by closing his eyes and meditate. He his struck by the very thoughts that every individual does at the initiation of this process. He starts out by purging his thoughts but upon realizing the impossibility of his action he starts objectifying them. The injection of god happens when he contemplates that deception might occur of evidentiary matters. Yet he profoundly asserts himself in a moment of spontaneity about his perception of certain things and his own existence. In this journey of thoughts, he sets out to find evidence of God’s existence rather than just believing that God exists merely because he can think. He believes the production of ideas …show more content…
He is on a journey to shed a light of the physical world and material things around him that he senses. He is considering about conceptual ideas to be true and are immutable laws of nature rather than his own fabrication. He can demonstrate all of the properties of the conceptual ideas he knows and, therefore, considers them as true and is most certain of all. He equates that since the concepts of sciences is an idea that exists within him and to is true then God must exist because the concept of God exists within him. He further clarifies that God does exist rather than just the concept of God. He is consumed with thoughts that every facet of geometry and mathematics can be explained through their various properties, so can God’s existence be proved through the nature of life and the very thought that God exist. He further concludes that whether dreaming or fully conscious that God does exist and everything is dependent upon …show more content…
He states that he has more grasp of the human mind than the perception of corporeal things. He has no doubt that God exist and is complete and independent unlike him who is incomplete and dependent on God. He believes that his perception of God has been instilled in him by the very entity and has ruled out deception, for deception can only be the work of the devil. He asserts infallibility of the perception of God because the very idea is instilled in him by God. He finds himself in the maze of circular reasoning about not erring about God because God is an entity that cannot err so the premise fulfills the conclusion. He is satisfied not knowing the reasons for his imperfection and relinquishes his critical intellect to mere some reasoning the supreme creator has. His reasoning for human errors is a simultaneous concurrence of intellect and will. He agrees that all the intellect should not be given to one person rather than be distributed amongst many. He also agrees that his intellect, faculty of understanding, memory or imagination are highly feeble and limited that of God.
Descartes asserts that he is incapable of mistakes if he thinks about God due to the fact that everything in him is bestowed upon him from God. But he is capable of mistake because he is not the supreme being or if he contemplates Oblivion. He knows that the sense of reasoning he got from God is finite and subject to mistakes. He

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