You Ve Got Thing Comin Rhetorical Analysis

1259 Words 6 Pages
Your groove: perhaps how music makes you feel, how it stimulates your body with the beat of a drum or the riff of a guitar. My groove: on the same level as your groove, only it goes just a bit further than just the feel. A machinist’s groove: the point at which a tool does work. We all see groove differently, figuratively and technically. We’ll be focusing on grooves that match up, your’s and mine, and how we’ll see that groove is more than just feelings. We’ll be exploring groove’s historically figurative nature, and how it’s interpreted by today’s experts in the music field. What makes our “grooves” groove? To understand groove, you must know where it’s come from, it’s rise of the in the music world. The term itself goes as far back as …show more content…
As said before, groove can be how music makes you feel, how you follow or move to a particular beat of a song. Think of it as this: you and a friend are listening to a song. Let’s say that song is “You’ve Got Another Thing Comin’” by Judas Priest. You both start tapping to the song, but you follow vocals while your friend follows the bass. Immediately, you should hear a difference between you and your friends tapping. That difference in beat is the basics of groove; to follow a beat your own way. Everyone has their favorite part to a song, so we all play along differently. To a musician, groove is making sure not all instruments follow the same same rhythm, but still sound great in the process. Now, use the example mentioned, the Judas Priest song, and imagine how it would sound if all instruments and the vocals were following the same notes and rhythm. It should sound very different for the most part. Some songs interpret this into their music. Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” incorporates it phenomenally into one part of their song in which, “Thunder bolts and lightning very very frightening me” (Mercury, F. and Queen, 1975) is sung with instruments following the vocals precisely. While great in its own right, imagine if the whole song was like this. Most of modern music, excluding classical, cannot incorporate such into a full song without sounding too ‘in your face’ about it or too distracting or annoying. There …show more content…
What makes “groove” groove? Well, it’s the organization of sound in today’s industry musicians work groove into their songs to make sounds be intentionally offbeat with other sounds. Groove today is just common practice, to be unique when and follow a beat your way. While you and I will probably not be making music in the future, those looking to enter the world of music should have a grip on what groove means, not from just a technical standpoint, but from the heart. Heart can be a major factor in groove and, of course, in music. You have to accept if something sounds better offbeat than in tempo. What you believe is great could be sub-par to the rest of your band or perhaps your producer. No one has ever agreed on the first version of a song. It takes editing and putting in or taking things out to reach that balance of groove you’re looking for. Technology has made these steps easier to visualize. Some have even taken advantage of the technological aspect of visualizing music, creating a new and different genre of music which includes electronic synthetic sounds. You could also think of groove as something metaphorical, that today’s music needs groove to be called music or to have a uniqueness to it. Believe what you will about groove, just know that you have the knowledge to see what is and isn’t groove in music, and know the scientific reasons for why a song makes you want to move around and dance. It’s all in the

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