African Influence On Jazz

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“I see trees of green, red roses, too, I see them bloom, for me and you, and I think to myself, what a wonderful world.” These are lyrics from “What a Wonderful World” created by a mastermind of jazz named Louis Armstrong. There are many famous jazz composers, including Jelly Roll Morton, Buddy Bolden, and Miles Davis. Most people consider jazz being created in New Orleans, but its roots began from African rhythms. Freed African-American slaves helped create jazz at the end of the 19th century. African music influenced jazz by use of rhythm, improvisation, call and response, and narrative techniques.

Rhythm is an important part in jazz. If there is no groove, then entertainment is not found. African rhythms are used in jazz constantly. For
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The most recent form is probably called a modern jazz, it is similar to a slow dance, but has a triplet feel mixed into a straight feel and the vocals are similar to a rap. One example of this is called “Seven Years” by Lucas Graham. Jazz will never stop changing; even though jazz was “invented” in the nineteenth century, it will always be a popular genre. When marching bands were popular in America, black musicians began to jazz up the marches, adding syncopated rhythms, 'bending ' notes and improvising on the melodies. These bands later turned into jazz bands when they removed marching. These new bands started making music more interesting by …show more content…
The primary factor was the importation of African slaves to a world dominated by warring European colonists-- particularly the French, Spanish, and English. In striving to keep African musical traditions alive, the slaves eventually found ways to blend them with the abiding traditions of Europe, producing hybrid in North and South America unlike anything in the old world.”

In 1987, the U.S. Congress passed a resolution declaring jazz a “Valuable National American treasure,” but the full text summarizes the confusion distributed by the music’s contradictory qualities. Jazz is an “art form” brought to the American people through well-funded classes and art programs, but it is also a “people’s music” that came upward from the desires of ordinary people. It is “an indigenous American music,” but also international, having been “adopted by musicians around the world.”
People may never know where exactly jazz came from, but why worry about that. People should enjoy listening to the engaging music or maybe even learn how to play it

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