Cuisines In South America

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The foods of South America are as diverse as the countries within the continent’s borders. South America is a country not only of cultural diversity but also of culinary diversity. One reason for this vast diversity is that each country in South America has been influenced by external cuisines and ingredients. Flavors and culinary influences from Africa, European Countries, Native Americans and even Asia have all had a hand in transforming South American cuisine into what it is today. Some of the world’s best dishes hail from South America, and their lasting legacy of flavors and ingredients have forever changed the global culinary scene, just as international flavors have long ago influenced traditional dishes helping them evolve into what …show more content…
They took the new foods back to Europe, and they brought European foods to South America, such as pigs, chickens, citrus trees, wheat, almonds, cows, goats. The Europeans learned to make their favorite Spanish, Italian and Portuguese dishes using local ingredients. The Native American traditional cooking methods were adapted and modified, and the newly available foods from Europe were mixed in. Asian and African immigrants brought their culinary traditions as well. All of this blended to become the diverse and exciting cuisine that exists today. Some native foods were not incorporated into the European-syle cuisine that dominates big cities like Buenos Aires and Santiago. But the indigenous populations continue to cultivate and eat them. Recently these foods have been rediscovered. Chefs in trendy restaurants are now showcasing Andean products such as alpaca meat, grains like quinoa and kiwicha, and unusual tubers such as yuca and maca in new …show more content…
Brazil’s national dish comes from humble origins though today it can be found on even the best menus. Feijoada is this dish, and it is a stewed combination of beef, pork and beans. Chilean cuisine is an interesting fusion of European flavors and indigenous ingredients. Seafood is commonly served, and while there is no common consensus on one single national dish, empanadas, caldillo de congrio (a soup made from eel, tomatoes, onions, potatoes and spices), and pastel de choclo are all considered national specialties. Chilean wines are especially good and are widely consumed. The inland dishes of Columbia vary greatly from the dishes of the coastal areas. Bandeja paisa, however, is considered to be the national dish. This dish is a combination of steak, sausage, rice and beans, and pork rinds that is then topped with one or more fried eggs and sliced avocado. Ecuador shares naming ceviche as their national dish with Peru. In Ecuador, ceviche is very popular along the coastal areas but inland the most popular food is a street food favorite called hornado. This is a dish of potatoes and roasted pig and can be found on just about any street corner in the mountainous areas of the

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