Hip Hop Culture: Comparing Rock And Roll

Decent Essays
Fuelled by youth and rebellion their formative years, both Hip Hop and Rock and Roll have risen to become the two of the most widely consumed genres of music in present day America. They can both be traced back to similar origins ans each emerged during notable periods in history. However, through active development of these genres over the years, the core/base demographics of Rock and Roll and Hip Hop have moved to opposite ends of the colour spectrum. This essay seeks to compare and contrast Rock and Roll and Hip Hop according to these variables.
Both Hip Hop and Rock and Roll rose out of eras of change in America. Each provided an opportunity for persons to speak out and express themselves within their own situation. Rock and Roll is, “a
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It is now considered one of the major platforms through which popular African-American culture is projected across the globe to unprecedented numbers of fans thanks to technological advancements. Hip Hop culture creates trends and influences society in a number of other ways and blacks are at the forefront of this. Rappers now command hefty album sales, tour and appearance fees making millions per annum. This is worth mentioning when you consider the origins of this genre; black impoverished youth in urban neighbourhoods. However, one can argue that the “white presence” in Hip Hop is largely behind the scenes in the form of ownership as it relates to talent management companies, record labels and media organizations. “For many youth the heroes and success stories of the inner-city are rappers. The popularity of rap and the spin-offs of hip-hop culture--fashion lines like FUBU and Tommy Hilfiger, movies such as Boyz N Da Hood and Friday, and television shows like The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and In the House--have had a major impact on American marketing trends. The appeal of hip-hop culture has pushed out of urban areas and into the suburbs. Hip-hop has had a tremendous influence on mainstream fashion, television, movies, advertising, and language. Hoping to follow the success of rappers like LL Cool J, Will Smith, Sean "Puffy" Combs, and Wyclef, many youth see the music industry as one of their only opportunities to achieve the notoriety and money to escape the hopelessness of the inner-city. However, those who attempt to succeed in hip-hop music face a difficult challenge. In an industry controlled by mainly by upper-class white men, young, urban minority musicians are often treated as commodities, not as artists.” (Becky Blanchard,

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