Federalism Vs Federalism

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There have been debates on whether a greater amount of individuals are represented within the United States of America. James Madison believed that by balancing factions and powers, the people would be better represented. However, both Giles and Page argue that the United States is not pluralist, but elitist. Therefore, the people are not represented fairly as money has more influence within politics. Trueman also concludes that the influence of money has a negative impact on the government of the United States. As a result, he concludes that the United Kingdom is more democratic. The reader concludes that money has negatively influenced the government of the United States, but does not discredit the work of Madison or find the United Kingdom …show more content…
They were the Federalists and the Anti- Federalists. The Anti- Federalists were concerned about the Federal government becoming too powerful. In contrast, John Jay, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton, under the the alias of Plubius, wrote the Federalist Papers, which supported a strong central government. Madison expands on the idea of a strong central government through the concept of federalism. In Federalist Paper Number 51, federalism is described by Madison as a strong central government with separate, but equal distribution of power. The ideas expressed by both the Federalists and Anti- Federalists were later expressed in the Constitution of the United States of America. The arguments that began with the Federalists and Anti- Federalists continue today within the United States of America. There is still a divide in regards to how strong the government should be and how the Bill of Rights should be interpreted. Moreover, Federalist Paper Number 10 was written by James Madison. The core argument in Federalist Paper Number 10 is that factions are problematic, however, unavoidable within a democracy. According to Madison, a faction can be defined as an organization in …show more content…
They both advance the beliefs, desires, and interests of groups within the community. James Madison states that “there are two methods of curing the mischief of faction: that one, by removing its causes; the other, by controlling its effects (“The Avalon Project : The Federalist Papers No. 10”). He contends that factions are problematic, thus the union should break away from them in order to have an effective government. Although he starts his essay by stating that there are two methods for combating factions, he concludes that “the inference to which we are brought is, that the CAUSES of faction cannot be removed, and that relief is only to be sought in the means of controlling EFFECTS” (“The Avalon Project : The Federalist Papers No. 10”). In relation to factions within the United States, he concludes that “from this view of the subject it may be concluded that a pure democracy... can admit no cure for the mischiefs of faction” (“The Avalon Project : The Federalist Papers No. 10”). His final conclusion is that factions are unavoidable within the system the United States is built on. Factions should be balanced by other factions, in which, he describes as the causes and effects. Since factions cannot be stopped, they can be controlled through the creation of other factions. As a result, balancing factions, according to Madison, creates an effective form of

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