How Did Alexander Hamilton Ratify The Constitution?

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While trying to ratify the constitution two parties were formed, the Federalist and Anti-Federalist. Now the Federalist wanted a strong government with a strong executive branch. Now the Federalist felt that the Constitution was fine just the way it was, that there was no need for a Bill of Rights. The Federalist also believed that only the elite and educated should be eligible to lead the colonies. Alexander Hamilton was a great influence with the Federalist since he believed that they should have a strong National Bank to manage money across state borders. Which in the long run was only helping his friends in Wall Street. Now the Federalist didn't want to have the central government to have more power than it did in the Articles of Confederation. The Federalist worked hard …show more content…
It didn't make sense for the National Government to have more power leaving the states weak. They also believed that the power among the three branches was not equally divided. The Anti-Federalist were more for the people, more of which were farmers and small landowners. More and more the Anti-Federalist believed that the Federalist were more interested in a aristocratic society which would be at the expense of the commoners of the colonies. Now the way the Federalist won over the ratification of the Constitution was that James Madison, John Jay, and Alexander Hamilton wrote The Federalist Papers which helped convinced some people to ratify the Constitution. Another factor that helped the Federalist win the ratification of the constitution was that only 9 out of 13 states had to agree. Even though in the Articles of Confederation it was stated that all 13 states must agree upon the terms. Then the Federalist would tell the people that they must ratify the Constitution and were later to add a Bill of Rights, which helped tremendously with the ratification of the

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