Patrick Henry And James Madison: Two Key Roles In The Development Of The Constitution

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In America’s most important document, Patrick Henry and James Madison played two key roles in the development of the Constitution. These two men had different views on how America should be governed. Patrick Henry who was against the new Constitution and sided with the Anti-Federalists. James Madison was the architect of the Constitution and felt a powerful government was needed in order for the colonies to not fall apart. After the Revolutionary War the colonies needed some help with the low imports from Britain since they were cut off from the war and the debt was increasing. As the Federalists and Anti-federalists argued on whether the Constitution should be formed, a conclusion was generated in 1788. Patrick Henry was born in 1736. His …show more content…
While growing up he was given a good education and taught that he should always have control. Madison also studied law. After school he was elected in the Virginia legislature and allied himself with Patrick Henry on the religious tolerance issues. After the term was up, Madison lost his bid and was not elected back into office. Madison returned home to take duties of a planter. Two years later he was elected in to the Continental Congress where he was recognized for his power. James Madison knew the Articles of Confederation were flawed and feared the government would not be able to win the war. He believed a stronger government could protect the United States. As he attended conventions, he took the lead for the Federalist on arguing why a constitution should be …show more content…
Henry argued that the constitution would jeopardize state sovereignty and the rights of the people. He also did not support it because it did not contain a Bill of Rights. Other arguments made by Henry were that Congress may destroy suffrage and elections will soon not matter and those in Congress would not follow same laws that the citizens would have to follow. Henry stated, “ If you make citizens of this country agree to become subjects of one great consolidated empire of America, your government will not have sufficient energy to keep them together.” James Madison argued back with popular opinions because states were ready for a change. He argued that an army was necessary, and argued taxes was not for the direct taxation but for tariffs and indirect taxes. Madison said the national government could not turn into a tyranny because the power would come from state government and the people not just the national government. As the debate continued, the Federalists continued to convince the remaining states to ratify. Once they agreed to add a Bill of Rights, the decision was

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