Pros And Cons Of Ratifying The Constitution

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From their conception and drafting in 1776, the Articles of Confederation were nothing but a reaction to the English government. When possible, the colonists continually strived to do the exact opposite of what the English government would. This effort to avoid tyranny resulted in a decentralized, weak, inefficient, and financially poor government, one that was also nigh impossible to change and amend. Not only did this later spur reform, but it also gave impetus to “those who favored a strong central government” (persons such as Alexander Hamilton).
After all thirteen states had ratified them, the Articles of Confederation became effective on March 1st, 1781. The governmental structures instituted by the Articles of Confederation included
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Similar to the super-majority present within the Articles of Confederation, nine out of the thirteen states needed to ratify the Constitution in order for it to become effective. The other issue was that it had become increasingly clear that the Constitution needed support from larger and more prominent states in order for it to be accepted and successful. The first states to ratify the Constitution were Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, and Connecticut. It was at this point where further opposition began to occur. Arguments against the Constitution included the loss of power that the states used to possess, and the lack of written out and specific individual rights. The first man to ease the fears and concerns of the people was James Madison. He promised that a Bill of Rights would be added to the Constitution as individual amendments if they would, in turn, be ratified. The greatest dissension and opposition towards the Constitution was in New York. In order to counteract the anti-federalists present in New York, James Madison, John Jay, and Alexander Hamilton wrote a conglomeration of essays called “The Federalist Papers”. These essays discussed the positive reforms that the Constitution would make, and how they would better the states as a whole. The papers must have been effective as many New York citizens read them, and the Constitution was ratified soon after. All the other states that needed to ratify the Constitution did not oppose it, and it became fully operational in September of

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