Cause And Effect Of Paxillin

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There are many diseases out there that effect the lungs, and can be life-threatening. They affect millions of people every year. Some examples would be lung cancer and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Cancer is a disease that, among other things, effects the communication between cells. Acute respiratory distress syndrome prevents oxygen from getting into the blood. With so many people being at risk, it can lead some people to wonder why the cure hasn’t already been created. There are many reasons, but one is related to the problem that diseases react differently for every person. Just like each person is different, every person’s cells react differently to different situations. A cell is made up of many different parts, and in order to …show more content…
Other researchers had already determined that paxillin contributes greatly to the structural integrity of the outer membrane of a cell. For instance, paxillin leads to the formation of actin structures that are located at the edge of a cell, such as lamellipodia. What scientist don’t know is exactly how paxillin effects different functions in a cell. In order to solve this mystery, Cress, et al. wanted to take the research further and determine the role that paxillin played in lamellipodia formation, and how paxillin affected the barrier that surrounds a cell. This would be a step toward finding out how much of an effect that proteins have in the restoration of the outer barrier of a cell. If scientist could figure this out, another step could be taken to figure out how to use proteins to fix cells. They did not want to test this theory on all types of cells, so they chose to only focus on human lung microvascular endothelial cells, or HLMVEC for short. That means that this study could really only directly help with the study of damaged lung cells. They also wanted to focus on how paxillin was effected by Y31 and Y118, which are specific amino acids that are used by cells to synthesize proteins. The scientists needed to know, if their theory was correct and paxillin had an effect on the barrier of a cell, how to synthesize more paxillin proteins. Moreover, they wanted to test the effects of both the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and the spingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) of a cell, which are how a cell develops and moves, and a factor in how permeable a cell is, respectively. They wanted to use both the HGF and the S1P as a factor to determine if what they were doing was effecting the cell at all. They tested mutated Y31 and Y118 amino acids in lung cells that reduced the production of paxillin. After

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