Brutus Weaknesses

Improved Essays
William Shakespeare has written 37 plays over his lifetime and died when he was only 52. During The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Julius Caesar is becoming the leader of Rome and everyone loves him. Brutus is a noble and respected man all throughout Rome. But, as Cassius brings up the idea of killing Caesar, Brutus is hesitant at first, but then finally decides he must do what is right for Rome. Brutus and the conspirators plot to kill Caesar and later carry out their plan, but left Caesar’s good friend, Antony, alive. After Brutus had spoken at the funeral, it was then Antony’s turn. He aroused the crowd against the conspirators and looked for his revenge against them. Brutus and the conspirators fled Rome and later went into battle against Anthony. …show more content…
Brutus is stubborn when it comes to his ideas against others. He believes that his ideas are better and he rarely sides with other ideas. This leads Brutus to be too trusting in his own ideas, that they lead to his downfall. Cassius says to Brutus, “Then, with your will, go on;/ we’ll along ourselves and meet them at Philippi.” (4.3.222-224). An explanation can be described as, Cassius has finally given up arguing with Brutus and lets the plan of marching to Philippi go through. And yet again, Brutus wins another argument. Brutus’ tragic flaw is evident, he strongly believes that his idea will work better than Cassius’. Brutus believes it is best to go to Philippi and meet Antony and his troops there. This was the plan that opposed Cassius’ idea that they wait from them and let them get tired as they march. As respected and honored as Brutus is, his idea seems smarter and wiser. As they use Brutus’ plan, this shows how he is always making decisions based on his own ideas. This reveals that Brutus does not consider other ideas that oppose his own, making him too trusting in his own. This example displays Brutus’ tragic flaw of being too trusting in his own ideas. This plan eventually backfires and both, Cassius and Brutus die on the day of the battle. This shows how Brutus’ tragic flaw of trusting his own ideas too much, can lead to his downfall. He convinces the others that it is best to march to Philippi, without giving the other plan much thought. Brutus is caught up in thinking he is right all of the time, that he does not ponder other ideas and thinks to quickly about one. This leads to his downfall because he is killed, after the battle, which was started by him making the decision to march to Philippi. As the conspirators plot to kill Caesar, they are deciding whether or not they should let Antony live. After Cassius suggests they kill Antony,

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    It shows how good of friends they were and how he was a little disappointed to kill him. But even though he kills Caesar for the right reasons, his friends do not. In the play, Brutus is the descendant of Junius Brutus. Junius Brutus kicked all the kings out of Rome and established a democracy. As Brutus reads a letter that Junius Brutus wrote, he thinks out loud, “My ancestors drove Tarquin from the streets…

    • 1216 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Brutus and caesar are friends and that is why it is difficult to join and kill him. On the opposing hand Marcus Brutus does want to join the conspiracy and overthrow Caesar. He wants to be part of overthrowing the great almighty Caesar, because he thinks that he will bring the roman republic down. As well as being a bad leader for their city. He is easily tricked and persuaded to join the conspiracy, for he believes that the other members are planning on killing him for the goodness of the democracy, the same reason he decides to join in with them on their quest.…

    • 1701 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In this scene Cassius is trying to convince Brutus to join the conspiracy to kill Caesar by playing on Brutus’s love for the democracy that his noble ancestor brought to Rome. Brutus decides to join them, but only because of his love for Rome, which leads to the next point of Shakespeare’s tragic hero. In order to be a tragic hero, the character has to suffer a catastrophe. Brutus’s catastrophe is that he sided with the conspiracy for the right and honorable reasons, while the rest of the conspirators did not. The reader can see from the beginning that Brutus is the only conspirator who can not make a decision about killing Caesar.…

    • 1748 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Someone once said, “Don’t let your loyalty become slavery. Know when to let go and never compromise on self respect.” If only Brutus, in Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, had heard those words before he joined the conspirators, and killed Caesar. Before Brutus actually goes through with the horrible deed of killing Caesar, Brutus makes the decision to join Cassius and the group of conspirators who are planning to kill Caesar. Brutus joins them being as he thinks that the conspirators have the intention of respectable and loyal Romans. At the death of Caesar, Antony becomes enraged and chases Brutus and Cassius out of Rome.…

    • 1440 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    When Brutus and the conspirators killed Caesar, Brutus thought that they were going to take over and keep the democracy in Rome, while the other conspirators had their own intentions in mind. Neither of them, Brutus and the conspirators, thought that the outcome of their actions would lead to a war. They both thought that somehow they would be in charge and Antony would respect their actions. Brutus’s idea of what was going to happen had changed the most because he did not realize the conspirators’ real intentions until his death. Right before he commits suicide he says, “Caesar, now be still; I kill 'd not thee with half so good a will,” (V.v.50-51).…

    • 1508 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the beginning, Cassius deceives Brutus into thinking that all of Rome want Brutus to be crowned by creating false letters from the public praising him. He immediately believes that the Romans do not want Caesar so he says to himself, “O Rome, I make thee promise, If the redress will follow, thou recievest Thy full petition at the hand of Brutus” (1118). This is an important scene because the reader now knows how easily Brutus can be influenced especially with his judgment that killing Caesar is what the people want. His vulnerability causes him to involve himself in the assassination, leading to his death in the end in which he killed himself out of guilt. Early in the story, Cassius emphasizes Brutus’ gullibility when he says to Casca, “Three parts of him Is ours already, and the man entire Upon the next encounter yields him ours” (1114).…

    • 993 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This, is why Brutus thought that, for the good of Rome, he may have to kill Caesar. Brutus says that if the suffering faces of Rome aren’t enough to motivate them to be able to kill Caesar, then they should just go home and let Caesar kill them at his whim. Brutus is saying that they should get the deed done, and then punish themselves afterwards. Then they wouldn’t be called murderers, but a group of people who healed Rome. He wants Rome to be free of the man who is one of his best friends, but is ruining the place in which they live.…

    • 1037 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Antony, although a “loyal” follower, was power hungry and as soon as Caesar had died, Antony was planning on how to take the power for himself. In Julius Caesar, after Brutus makes the final stab, Antony states, “I doubt not of your wisdom./ Let each man render me his bloody hand.” (III.i.183-184). This makes it seem as though Antony is with the conspirators. Then when they funeral speeches take place Antony says, “O masters! if I were dispos’d to stir/ Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage, I should do Brutus and Cassius wrong,/ Who (you all know) are honorable men.” (III.ii.119-122).…

    • 1075 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Furthermore, Caesar notices the danger that Cassius may present to him, but instead of considering possible implications, he instead chooses to ignore Cassius because of his pride. After noting that “Cassius has a lean and hungry look” (1.2.204), he thinks that “[s]uch men are dangerous” (1.2.205), but then concludes that Cassius could not be dangerous to him “for always I am Caesar” (1.2.222). Again, Caesar is brought evidence of his future demise, and again, Caesar’s pride deceives him into a false sense of security that condemns him to death. Even when he does die, he chooses to resign by his own word rather than at the stab of a conspirator. Seeing the senators' betrayal, he proclaims “Et tu, Brutè?—Then fall, Caesar” (3.1.85).…

    • 1565 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the heat of the moment, he begins fighting Tybalt and kills him. This then leads to his banishment, Juliet 's sorrow, and eventually, their deaths. If Tybalt did not kill Mercutio, none of the chain of horrible events would have happened, and Romeo and Juliet would still have been alive. Even though Lord Capulet is Juliet 's father, he is also partially responsible for their deaths. First of all, he sets up the marriage between Juliet and Paris without consulting her first.…

    • 1039 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays