Brutus Issues

Improved Essays
Robert Yates (Brutus I) was a politician and a judge for Anti-Federalist stances. Brutus emphasized on many things such as opposing to the expansion of a national government, worked against the adoption of the Constitution, and was one of the most vocal delegates in support of the protection of individual liberties. Brutus found many issues regarding the legislation granting the government too much power, power given to the judiciary, the preamble setting ends of a clause, and congress granting power over multiple things. These issues became important when they began to affect the liberties of many citizens. Two of Brutus’s main issues/concerns (in which I found interesting) is that the legislation gave the government too much power, and power …show more content…
The powers of these courts are very extensive; their jurisdiction comprehends all civil causes, except such as arise between citizens of the same state; and it extends to all causes in law and equity arising under the constitution…These courts will be, in themselves, totally independent of the states, deriving their authority from the United States…they will swallow up all the powers of the courts in the respective states. (Brutus)
Brutus was concerned that if laws were held by a supreme court and by lower federal courts, this will have resulted in the increase of the jurisdiction of the courts, thus when giving power to the judiciary, powers of states will become
…show more content…
James Madison (Federalist No. 45 and opponent to Brutus) who was the 4th president of the United States was a federalist who wrote one of the three federalist papers. Madison made such a huge contribution to the ratification of the constitution that he was called The Father of the Constitution. James Madison found the Union to be “essential to the happiness of the people of America” (Publius), and stated that both the state and the federal governments helped one another. The state and federal governments granted the federal powers to be exercised on external objects such as war, peace, negotiation, foreign commerce and taxation, and the state powers to be exercised on the lives, liberties, and properties of people. James Madison believed granting power to the constitution helped build a nation, oppose to the anti-federalists who worried about others and their liberties. According to Madison, he believed no other union was incapable of existing with his ideal vision, “the existence of the State governments is incompatible with any system whatever that accomplishes the essential purposes of the Union

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