Effects Of Black Death On European Society

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Europe has always been known as a whole for its diverse cultures, and long and rich history. Nearly every part of Europe has influenced American society, however, England has affected the United States the most for obvious reasons. Before European nations, like England, could colonize or influence any other part of the world, stability was put to a halt as millions fell to the most fatal disease recorded in European history, the Black Death, or Bubonic Plague. Beginning in the Late Middle Ages around 1340, Europeans were unable to escape the grip of death as the Black Death was transmitted in three different forms: pneumonic, septicemic, and bubonic. Europeans affected by the Black Death usually only lived for two days after contact. The Black Death was so devastating to European society because the disease affected religious, social, and economic aspects of daily life significantly. Religion during the Middle Ages was a crucial part of everyday life. The Church was often demanding, and followers of the Church were constantly striving to be perfect citizens as they hoped for salvation and entry into heaven. As the Black Death laid claim to the lives of innocent people, those who were not affected tried to explain the causes of …show more content…
Before the Black Death had arrived to Europe from China, Europeans were already suffering from the Great Famine of 1315 - 1322 and economic decline. Crop failures led to a population crisis and then a shortage of labor. The population crisis from the famine cannot compare with the “post-plague population,” though, which rounds to be a little over seventy-two million people (Document 8). The “estimated long-term impact on population” after the Black Plague in 1450 was about sixty million people (Document 9). Such a decline in population halted productivity and trade, and led to a long and difficult reconstruction after the Black Death came to an

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