Baddeley's Theory Of Working Memory Essay

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The most prominent theory of working memory is Baddeley’s multicomponent model (Baddeley,1986, 2000; Baddeley & Hitch,1974). The assumption of this theory is that working memory is made up of several different components. These components are the phonological loop, the visuo-spatial sketchpad, the episodic buffer, and the central executive.
The phonological loop, visuo-spatial sketchpad, and episodic buffer are specialized subsystems under the control of a generalized executive controller, which brings these together and runs the operation. The phonological loop is part of working memory that is responsible for processing verbal and auditory information. The visuo-spatial sketchpad is responsible for processing visual and spatial knowledge. The episodic buffer is where numerous modules of information from different sources are combined or formed into one cohesive unit. The phonological loop and visuo-spatial sketchpad subsystems are relatively separate from each other and these different types of information tend not to influence one and another.
This experiment is designed to see if the phonological loop and visuo-spatial sketchpad subsystems are actual separate units from each other and to test whether these two different units interfere with each or whether they run
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This experiment includes two test perimeters to test the different components of working memory. The first component tests the phonological loop system. To test the phonological loop system my husband recorder ten words which I would try to memorize while playing the game. The second test perimeter tested the visuo-spatial sketchpad system. In this component of the testing, my husband showed 10 different images on my Kindle while I played the game. These individual sessions were done a total of three times each for each individual memory component being

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