Analysis Of No One Ever Asked Me By Hollis Gabler

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Hollis Stabler insisted he was not a hero but simply an Omaha man and a soldier with stories to share. His account of his life and experiences in World War II adds humanity to the battles and campaigns of North Africa and Italy and honors the memories of his fallen comrades. Throughout his narrative, Stabler highlight the racial and class significance of family and belonging through the Omaha clan system and his encounters with orphaned and abandoned individuals. The significance of family and clan to Omaha society is introduced when Stabler’s parents married. Stabler explained that “the Omahas have ten clans, five of the Sky People and Five of the Earth People” (Stabler, No One Ever Asked Me, pg. 5). Stabler’s mother, Eunice, was a member …show more content…
This was the case for Stabler’s wife, LaVeeda. LaVeeda was white, but Stabler’s mother, Eunice, ensured that LaVeeda was adopted by an Omaha family and became part of Omaha clan society. This ensured their decendence have a place in Omaha society (Stabler, No One Ever Asked Me, pg. 126). LaVeeda’s integration into Omaha society did not end with her adoption; she wanted to be an active member of Omaha culture. Like Stabler entrance into Omaha ceremonial life over a decade earlier, she joined Omaha society by dancing at a powwow. She asked her mother-in-law for assistance like her husband did as a boy, and Eunice gave her a buckskin dress. LaVeeda learned to dance and represent Omaha culture. She won first place in her first powwow and the women adopted her into Omaha society (pg. 130). LaVeeda was a member of the Omaha, and she embraced its culture. She made and wore traditional regalia and her shawls became prized on the powwow circuit (pg. 138). LaVeeda was not born Omaha, but she wanted to be a part of her husband’s culture. Through her dedication and participation, she was became part of the Omaha …show more content…
Stabler’s narrative highlights many orphaned people without clan or place. Some of these individuals, like Stabler’s ancestor Long Wing, or the Alaskan girl whom Stabler met at school, found a new family and were adopted and cared for. Victoria Woohaull met Long Wing while he was at boarding school and adopted him. He provided for his education and financial needs (Stabler, No One Ever Asked Me, pg. 2). The Alaskan girl was adopted by a well off white family and moved to Wichita. Although Stabler does not provide much information about her or even her name, but he implies that she was happy with her parents and that they provided for her future (pg. 22). Long Wing and the Alaskan girl lost their original families, but found their place with a new family. Unfortunately, not ever orphan found a new family and

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