Summary Of Lauren Slater's Lying

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Lauren Slater is an American Psychologist and a writer. The book Lying “is a memoir of drawing boundaries between what we know as fact and what we believe through the creation of our own personal fictions” (back cover). Lauren Slate, in my opinion, is a genius. I believed she fooled the readers. Her profession, her life is based on psychology. Psychology is based on examining the mind and behaviors. She used her profession and experience in convincing her readers that she does have problems and conflicting the readers on this book. Slater uses the ethical dilemmas, private/ publicness and the metaphors of truth. Our world is full of tabloids and ethically a mess. I believe she represents the types of people in the world and people she has seen …show more content…
She wrote a book about Mental Health for Women, in which is a guide for women to take control of their mental health. The book explains the psychological importance of women’s sexuality and relationships, and the affects of social contexts, such as poverty and racism. Lauren Slater is a psychologist, she uses the three structures of Freud’s personality theory, Id, ego, and superego. Id is based on instincts. This personality is unconscious, and it demands the id desires, and needs. If these desires, and needs are not met it will result to anxiety or problematic within the complex human behaviors. Ego is based on Reality. This sort of personality, is the desires of realistic and social behaviors. Finally, superego is based on Morality. This is based on the ideals on our senses of what is right and wrong. She uses the three structures through examining her memories, and she explains in her book. One of the main conflicted and ethically wrong part of what Lauren did was, she claimed that she has epilepsy. The entire book, Slater explains her diagnosis, the development of seizures and the neurological disturbances, also the compulsion to lie. Many readers believe it was wrong of Slater to input graphic details of epilepsy, illnesses and even the situation with the 50-year-old man. My own view is that Slater is telling somewhat of a truth, but in an exaggerated way. Though I concede that Slater should be question of her profession, I still maintain that she is in fact a genius. For example, Slater is a psychologist, whom wrote about women’s mental health. The issue is important because if she was crazy or messed up person, how is she able to publish a book about women’s health? We can think about in another perspective, as in it was terrible for her to tell a lie. However, what is a lie? Can a lie not telling the truth, or is it telling a story that may or may not be true, but it is just a story. Our world, as I

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