Ray Charles I Got A Woman Analysis

Decent Essays
I Got a Woman was top charting song for Ray Charles in 1955. This recording was different and inspired by a gospel song “It Must Be Jesus” by the Southern Tones. Ray Charles was able to take the gospel song and add a jazz and rhythm and blues to it. Though, this recording was not a cup of tea for everyone, it was able to sell in two different markets of music and be a success. This analysis will look at the genius Ray Charles who combine the elements of jazz, gospel, and blues structure to create this top-charting recording.

Firstly, Ray Charles recording of I Got a Women music aspects allows different sound for various genres come into play and this allows the music to have the blues/soul structure. In the recording, there are saxophones
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Throughout, this whole recording there is only one voice that is presented and the vocal harmonies in the recording are kept very sweet constant by Ray Charles, himself. The sound of the voices is constantly changing from low to high pitch as he sings the verses, which shows at the beginning of recording he elaborates the notes on "Well... I got a women” is shouted. Throughout this recording, Ray Charles voice is melodic and also uses blues vocal techniques, for example one technique that is heard throughout the recording is glissando at the beginning of the recording. The glissando is a movement from one note to another using a line of notes. This heard when he sing the word "Well" in an indefinite way. Another place you can hear glissandi is in "way over town, oh yeah". Ray Charles uses glissando to create the shouting word like "oh yeah" sometimes, also the vocal delivery throughout this recording is more melodic than rhythmic cause of high notes but also it sung in gospel voice. Ray Charles sound of voices fits the music/lyrics of the song because he uses a dominant powerful gospel voice that helps create the emotion filled voice, but also adapts blue vocal style of growling, scooping, and sliding techniques. Overall, the vocal style and quality provides an understanding the recording as a whole and understanding that it combines gospel vocal with jazz, rhythm and blues …show more content…
The music and lyrics fit together very nicely. Ray Charles is a genius by combine jazz, gospel and blues elements to create this recording. Ray Charles used a call and response structure for this recording which allows after lyrical phrase the instruments response by place a certain upbeat notes. Ray Charles used this methods after every two measure and during the measures the band will play chord, which follow a certain scheme that fit the jazz/blues. Ray Charles stops this for some time and then he uses another scheme which he sings one part and the band has resets and then play two different chords that are complementary, this is a key feature in blues/soul music. The overall sound of this recording is soft and smooth, but very upbeat. The sound of recording sound like it was production and did not take that long. The amazing thing about Ray Charles is most of his work and time in the studio is all improvise. For example, the masterful saxophone and piano solo was all improvised, which allow the beat to more real and not rehearsed. This allows the overall sound to have a more natural sound which allow the instruments to find way in compliment different chords together. All in all, the overall sound plays a role in how the sound of recording is so unique in its time and provides a new sound in

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