Virtual Jazz Concert Analysis

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For my own virtual jazz band, I wanted to try and pick jazz musicians who could mend well with a dance or a swing band. Max Roach on drums, Charles Mingus on bass, Benny Goodman on clarinet, Lester Young on tenor sax, Cannonball Adderly on alto sax, Joe “Tricky Sam” Nanton on trombone, Dizzy Gillespie on trumpet, Ella Fitzgerald and Cab Calloway as singers, and Duke Ellington on piano and as the bandleader. The group would have the style of early 20th century dance bands and do a live performance in front of an audience, possibly with a dance floor. The style of the band, as a whole, would take after a lot of Duke Ellingtons’ early big bands. As individuals, each musician adds to the overall sound, but still creates a style of the classics they would perform that swing. The songs they would perform would be: “Take the A Train” by Duke Ellington,”It Don’t Mean a Thing (If it Ain’t Got That Swing)” by Duke Ellington, “Blues in Hoss Flat” by Count Basie, “Salt Peanuts” by Dizzy Gillespie, “Sing Sing Sing” by Benny Goodman, “Shaw Nuff” by Dizzy Gillespie, “Dinah” by Louis Armstrong, and “Cottontail” by Duke Ellington. With this set list and the musician’s lineup, some songs will allow the jazz …show more content…
Songs with lyrics attached to them would have Cab Calloway projecting his chest voice to the world in a fun way and with Ella Fitzgerald’s superb improvisation and unique tone, only suited to her. There would be a solid foundation of Charles Mingus, who would also add flair to the walking bass line without missing a beat, and Max Roach who, on occasion, would drop serious bombs. The swinging and high range of Cannonball Adderley and his fast notes create a heart-pumping aspect of the saxophone. While Lester Young adds a light individuality to the saxophone sound, which creates a layer of airiness

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