An Analysis Of Historical Divides: Jane Addams And Mary Richmond?

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An Analysis of Historical Divides: Jane Addams and Mary Richmond
As a founder of social work, Jane Addams embraced social and economic rights in addition to social change for everyone (Anders, & da Silveira Nunes Dinis, 2015). Her work through Hull-House revealed her collaboration of culture, social, and political functions (Anders, & da Silveira Nunes Dinis, 2015). As an example, she was an advocate for women issues, believed in the removal of racisms and sexism globally, assisted with the provision of food distribution, jobs, and education through social justice (Anders, & da Silveira Nunes Dinis, 2015). Clearly, we see a demonstration of Addams being consistent with the macro practitioner with community interventions inclusive of management,
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In other words, it was important to focus on approaches that was educative to client change which led to the emphasis of viewing the social worker as a skillful teacher with social approaches to develop and reform (Murdach, 2011). The social work’s mission includes all levels, yet, the historical divide regarding the different level of micro, mezzo, and macro practice still exist (Hill, Ferguson, & Erickson, 2010). Richmond would be identified as the “direct social work practitioner” (Hill, Ferguson, & Erickson, …show more content…
Because of this, social justice is achieved through the servitude of people deemed as vulnerable, and oppressed, along with living in poverty (Jacobson, 2001). We also understand its pivotal role in the service it delivers to those in need by a way of the social policy arena devising and advocating to address the wide range of social problems in order to bring about change (Jacobson, 2001). Ironically, social policy efforts that are recent is aimed at the establishment or the protection of social workers roles, verses promoting transformations in the delivery of human services (Jacobson, 2001). It is also suggest more often in today’s society, social work students are more readily trained as clinical practitioners than advocates of change (Jacobson, 2001). Although there is a continuation of promoting social justice and action, strategies of this type is no longer prioritized (Jacobson, 2001). Meanwhile, the power discrepancy of the client’s individual problem which bears a resemblance to a therapist is most prevalent oppose to the larger systemic issues for personal and social good (Jacobson, 2001). Thus, we see how schisms yet exist in contemporary

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