Crisis Intervention In Social Work Practice

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Crises are something which cannot be avoided throughout the course of an individual’s lifetime. It is associated with life changes and the transition from childhood to adulthood. This is made worse when people go through hazardous events such as a loss in the family, job loss or financial issues (Healy, 2014). Crisis intervention aims to help with how people manage and deal with these crises, if handled well can contribute to someone’s personal growth (Healy, 2014). This essay will describe the crisis intervention method, how it came about and how relevant it is to the social work practice. It will also discuss how crisis intervention can be used in practice and whether it is required in the social work practice.
Cree (2011) defines crisis
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Crisis intervention is primarily used in the aftermath of a crisis; it is during this period that the crisis intervention is most powerful. It is typically considered that a crisis does not last more than six weeks and for people to return to their normal steady state. Crisis intervention is based on three factors; people’s internal psychological strengths and weakness, the nature of the problem and the quality of help provided (Trevithick, 2011). This concept sounds theoretical in nature and could present some practical implications. Some individuals may take longer than 6 weeks to overcome a crisis episode. Nevertheless, it provides a good link to the factors which is associated with crisis episodes and demonstrates that the role of a social worker is significant in returning to a steady …show more content…
However, discrimination in practice is unintentional and some people may discriminate without being aware of it. This is due to cultural and structural ideologies which has been embedded in our society. In order to avoid discrimination when dealing with crisis, it is imperative that social workers address the crisis with knowledge and understanding of the crisis and the challenges that may occur from discrimination (Thompson, 2011). This is because those who suffer from crisis are considered vulnerable and powerless, therefore there is a chance of them being exploited. Social workers must be able to use their power to help clients move forward in a way that empowers them and gives them control over their lives (Thompson,

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