Albatross In The Red Sky On Friday Analysis

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The Highs and Lows of “Albatross in the Red Sky on Friday: Does Irrational Superstition on the Great Lakes Make a Difference?” Bowling Green State University, Firelands Campus student Sara E. Cordle wrote an in-depth essay entitled; “Albatross in The Red Sky; Does Irrational Superstition on The Great Lakes Make a Difference?, explaining how the maritime superstitions had a major impact on the seamen of the Great Lakes. The author states how these superstitions can affect the seamen psychologically as well as physiologically and how they can put their crew members in great danger. The author does an excellent job of proving this point over all yet fails to mention much about the opposing side and how, in the author’s defense, it is wrong. By reflecting on the opposing side in greater detail, it may have made the author’s essay slightly stronger. The author of this essay explains how seamen of the Great Lakes obtain excellent reasons …show more content…
The only thing that this essay is lacking is that it doesn’t touch on the opposing side. To make this essay stronger, the writer should have made points that the opposing side would have made and explained how those points are logically or historically not accurate. For example, instead of just saying why such maritime superstitions should be taken seriously and backing them up, Cordle could have presented us with the reasons why people don’t believe in these superstitions and point out the flaws in the reasoning of the opposing side instead of presenting us few of the superstitions and providing evidence to prove it. Cordle writes, “Is maritime superstion really so irrational? Does it make a difference? No, it is not so irrational, as most superstitious fears can be backed by logical human responses.” (Cordle

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