Absurdity And Repetition In Entr Acte

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Entr’Acte is an early avant-garde film produced by Erik Satie and Rene Clair. In this film, two artists integrated repetitive moving image with one melody, which kept coming back, and they diffused their attitude of life into the entire production. Absurdity and repetition play extremely important roles in Entr’Acte, that both of the characteristics not only reconcile one foundational structure of the film, but also create hierarchical variations in either visual aspect or auditory aspect.
Repetition in Entr’Acte builds up the fundamental structure rather than confuse the audience. Some scenes are repetitive like the overlapping architecture, ballet dancing, roller coaster. Satie said, “An artist must organize his life” (216). Besides his attitude about personal life, it is conspicuous in Entr’Acte that Satie allocated one melody into the majority of the main scenes that make the structure of the sound likes a rondo. As long as main scenes display on the screen that the sound turn into the repetitive melody, and in contrast, abstract industrial-like moving images adhere to remaining repetitive melody. These fragmented dissection of scenes exhibit absurdity rather than a well-written plot.
Does the absurdity come no reason Entr’Acte? The answer is no. Under Surrealism’s
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Relating to Satie’s Vexations, there was only a one-page score with one simple instruction attached at the bottom -- the pianist needs to play 840 times. This score seems monotonous and vapid when listeners sit in the concert hall. Due to different circumstances like the pianist’s mood, the pianist cannot strike keys like the first time; moreover, there are ten pianists to complete the full duration. In Entr’Acte, Satie kept bringing back one melody again and again, and when it incorporates with different scenes, the melody itself reinforces the absurd plot and cultivates distinct

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